Friday, January 21, 2022
Prague Travel Guide - Travel S Helper

Prague

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Prague is the Czech Republic’s capital and biggest city. It is the 14th most populous city in the European Union. It is also Bohemia’s historical capital. The city, located on the Vltava River in the country’s northwestern corner, is home to around 1.26 million people, with a broader metropolitan zone estimated to have a population of over 2 million. The climate of the city is moderate, with pleasant summers and cold winters. Prague has the European Union’s lowest unemployment rate.

Throughout its 1,100-year history, Prague has been a political, cultural, and economic center of Central Europe, with varying fortunes. Prague, founded during the Romanesque period and prospering throughout the Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque periods, was not only the capital of the Czech state, but also the seat of two Holy Roman Emperors and hence the capital of the Holy Roman Empire. It was an important city for the Habsburg Monarchy and its Austro-Hungarian Empire, and it became the capital of Czechoslovakia following World War I. The city was pivotal in the Bohemian and Protestant Reformations, the Thirty Years’ War, and twentieth-century history, including both World Wars and the postwar Communist period.

Prague is home to a variety of well-known cultural sites, many of which escaped the turmoil and devastation of twentieth-century Europe. The Prague Castle, the Charles Bridge, the Old Town Square with the Prague astronomical clock, the Jewish Quarter, Petn hill, and Vyehrad are among the main attractions. The vast historic center of Prague has been on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites since 1992.

There are over 10 major museums in the city, as well as several theaters, galleries, cinemas, and other historical exhibitions. The city is linked by an extensive contemporary public transit infrastructure. It also has a diverse spectrum of public and private schools, including Charles Institution in Prague, Central Europe’s oldest university. According to GaWC surveys, Prague is rated as a “Alpha-” global metropolis, ranking with Vienna, Seoul, and Washington, D.C. Its rich history makes it a famous tourist attraction, and as of 2014, the city had more than 6.4 million foreign tourists. After London, Paris, Istanbul, and Rome, Prague is the fifth most visited city in Europe. The cheap cost of living in Prague makes it a popular choice for expats coming to Europe.

Prague – Info Card

POPULATION : City: 1,259,079  /  Metro: 2,156,097
FOUNDED :  c. 885
TIME ZONE : CET (UTC+1) Summer: CEST (UTC+2)
LANGUAGE : Czech 83.0%, Slovak 2%, other 15.0%
RELIGION : Roman Catholic 26.8%, Protestant 2.1%, other 3.3%, unspecified 68.7%,
AREA : 496 km2 (192 sq mi)
ELEVATION : 177 m (581 ft) – 399 m (1,309 ft)
COORDINATES : 50°5′N 14°25′E
SEX RATIO : Male: 49.22%
 Female: 50.78%
ETHNIC : Czech 83.0%, Slovak 2%, Others (Ukraine, Russia, Vietnam) 15.0%
AREA CODE : +420 
POSTAL CODE : 100 00 – 199 00
DIALING CODE : 
WEBSITE : www.praha.eu

Tourism in Prague

For more than a millennium, the surface of the swan-filled Vltava River has reflected this city of bridges, cathedrals, gold-tipped towers, and church domes. Prague’s tiny medieval center, mostly unharmed by World War II, maintains a beautiful blend of cobbled alleyways, walled courtyards, cathedrals, and uncountable church spires all under the shadow of her great 9th century castle, which faces eastward as the sun sets behind her. Prague is also a contemporary and bustling city, full of energy, music, cultural art, excellent eating, and unique events to satisfy the independent traveller’s hunger for adventure.

Many consider it to be one of Europe’s most attractive and lovely cities.

The city is home to a variety of well-known cultural sites, many of which escaped the turmoil and devastation of twentieth-century Europe. The Prague Castle, the Charles Bridge, Old Town Square with the Prague astronomical clock, the Jewish Quarter, Petn hill, and Vyehrad are among the main attractions. The vast historic center of Prague has been on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites since 1992.

There are over 10 major museums in the city, as well as several theaters, galleries, cinemas, and other historical exhibitions.

Its rich history makes it a popular tourist attraction, with more than 4.4 million foreign tourists each year.

Prague accounts for over half of the country’s tourist revenue. The city has roughly 73,000 beds in lodging facilities, the majority of which were constructed after 1990, including over 51,000 beds in hotels and boarding houses.

The city was a famous shooting destination for international projects such as Hollywood and Bollywood motion movies from the late 1990s to the late 2000s. International film production companies have found the mix of design, inexpensive prices, and existing motion picture infrastructure to be appealing.

Climate of Prague

Prague is located between an oceanic climate and a humid continental climate.

Winters are quite chilly, with average temperatures around freezing and little sunlight. Between mid-November and late March, snowfall is typical.

Throughout addition, there are a few spells of moderate weather in the winter.

Summers are often bright and sunny, with an average high temperature of 24 °C (75 °F). Even in the summer, nights may be rather chilly.

Geography of Prague

Prague is located at 50°05″N and 14°27″E on the Vltava River. Located in the heart of the Bohemian Basin. Prague is around the same latitude as Frankfurt, Paris, France, and Vancouver, Canada.

Economy of Prague

Prague’s economy accounts for 25% of the Czech Republic’s GDP, making it the country’s best-performing regional economy. According to Eurostat, its GDP per capita in purchasing power parity is €42,800 in 2007. At 172 percent of the EU-27 average, Prague was named the fifth best-performing European NUTS two-level area.

Many multinational corporations have their European headquarters in the city.

Prague employs over one-fifth of the Czech workforce, and its earnings are much higher than the national average (+25 percent). In December 2015, the average salary in Prague was 35,853 CZK. This reflected an annual rise of 3.4 percent, which was lower in nominal and real terms than the national growth of 3.9 percent. (In December, inflation in Prague was 0.5 percent, compared to 0.1 percent nationwide.) The city’s economic structure has evolved from industrial to service-oriented since 1990. Pharmaceuticals, printing, food processing, transportation equipment manufacturing, computer technology, and electrical engineering are all examples of industries. Financial and commercial services, commerce, restaurants, hotels, and public administration are the most important in the service industry. Services employ around 80% of the workforce. Prague has 800,000 workers, including 120,000 commuters. Despite the country’s economic crisis, the number of (legally registered) foreign residents in Prague has been growing. As of March 2010, 148,035 foreign workers were estimated to be residing in the city, accounting for around 18% of the workforce, an increase from 131,132 in 2008. The city accounts for almost one-fifth of all investment in the Czech Republic.

Prague accounts for over half of the country’s tourist revenue. The city has roughly 73,000 beds in lodging facilities, the majority of which were constructed after 1990, including over 51,000 beds in hotels and boarding houses.

The city was a famous shooting destination for international projects such as Hollywood and Bollywood motion movies from the late 1990s to the late 2000s. International film production companies have found the mix of design, inexpensive prices, and existing motion picture infrastructure to be appealing.

Prague’s contemporary economy is mostly service and export-based, and the city was awarded the best city in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) for business in a 2010 study.

According to The Economist’s livability rankings, Prague was named one of the top three cities in Central and Eastern Europe in 2005. In the 2010 2thinknow annual analysts Innovation Cities Index, the city was declared a top-tier nexus city for innovation across several sectors of the global innovation economy, ranking 29th worldwide out of 289 cities, ahead of Brussels and Helsinki for innovation. The New Town street Na pkop is the most costly in Central Europe.

According to Eurostat, Prague placed fifth among Europe’s 271 regions in terms of GDP per inhabitant, attaining 172 percent of the EU average. It came in slightly ahead of Paris and much ahead of the Czech Republic as a whole, which scored 80% of the EU average.

Prague is also home to some of the Czech Republic’s most prominent agencies and organizations.

Internet, Comunication in Prague

It is simple and inexpensive to get a local SIM card with 3G connection. Packages differ, so double-check before you buy.

Many hostels and hotels have free internet access on shared computers or over a wireless network, so inquire before paying extra at one of Prague’s many internet cafés.

Almost all McDonald’s and KFC fast food locations provide paying customers with unsecured, free WiFi networks. Most other restaurants and cafés also provide free WiFi, frequently without advertising – look for a network with the name of the place and ask the staff for the password.

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