Friday, January 28, 2022

Culture Of Brazil

South AmericaBrazilCulture Of Brazil

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Because of Brazil’s continental dimensions, its diverse geography, history and population, the country’s culture is rich and varied. It has several regional variations, and despite being mostly united by one language, some regions are so different that they look like different countries.

Music plays an important role in the Brazilian identity. Styles such as choro, samba and bossa nova are considered authentically Brazilian. Caipira music also has its roots in sertanejo, the national equivalent of country music. MPB is the acronym for Brazilian popular music, which groups several national styles under one term. Forró, a lively dance music style from the northeast, has also spread throughout the country. New urban styles include funk – the name given to a genre of dance music from Rio’s favelas that mixes heavy electronic beats with often raunchy rap – and techno-brega, a popular crowd pleaser in the northern states that fuses romantic pop, dance music and Caribbean rhythms.

A mixture of martial arts, dance, music and games. Capoeira was brought to Brazil by African slaves, mainly from the Portuguese colonies of Angola. It is characterised by spirited and complex movements, accompanied by music, and can be seen and practised in many Brazilian cities.

In classical music, the modern period is particularly notable for the works of composers such as Heitor Villa-Lobos and Camargo Guarnieri, who created a typically Brazilian school by mixing elements of traditional European classical music with Brazilian rhythms, while other composers such as Cláudio Santoro followed the guidelines of the Second Vienna School. In the Romantic period, the biggest name is Antonio Carlos Gomes, author of some Italian-style operas with typically Brazilian themes, such as Il Guarany and Lo Schiavo. In the Classical period, the most prominent name is José Maurício Nunes Garcia, a priest who wrote sacred and secular music and was greatly influenced by the Viennese Classical style of the 18th and early 19th centuries.

Candomble and Umbanda are religions of African origin that have survived prejudice and persecution and still have many followers in Brazil. Their places of worship are called terreiros and many are open to visitors.

Indigenous traits are everywhere in Brazilian culture, from cuisine to vocabulary. Numerous indigenous groups and tribes still live in all regions of Brazil, although many of them have been heavily influenced by Western culture and several of the country’s surviving indigenous languages are in danger of disappearing completely. The traditional way of life and graphic expressions of the Wajãpi indigenous group in the state of Amapá have been declared a UNESCO Masterpiece of the World Intangible Heritage [www].

Globo, the largest national television channel, also plays an important role in the formation of national identity. Nine out of ten households own a television set, which is the main source of information and entertainment for most Brazilians, followed by radio broadcasts. Television broadcasts sports, films, local and national news, as well as telenovelas (soap operas) – 6-10 month series that have become one of the country’s main cultural exports.

How To Travel To Brazil

By airThe cheapest airfares are from February (after Carnival) to May and from August to November. Tickets from New York, for example, can cost as little as US$699 including taxes. Many underbooked flights within Brazil are available at low prices.São Paulo-Guarulhos International Airport (IATA: GRU) is by far the...

How To Travel Around Brazil

By airBrazilian Air PassportIf you are planning to visit different cities in Brazil, consider buying a Brazil Air Pass offered by TAM or Gol - you buy between 4 and 9 tickets that can be used at any time to any destination in Brazil served by the airline. The...

Destinations in Brazil

RegionsBrazil is the fifth largest country in the world. It is divided into five regions, which are mainly oriented towards state borders, but also more or less follow natural, economic and cultural boundaries.North (Acre, Amapá, Amazonas, Pará, Rondônia, Roraima, Tocantins).The Amazon, the rainforest and border life, with a notable...

Weather & Climate in Brazil

Brazil's climate encompasses a wide range of weather conditions over a vast area and varied topography, but most of the country is tropical. According to the Köppen system, Brazil has five main climate subtypes: equatorial, tropical, semi-arid, mountain tropical, temperate and subtropical. The different climatic conditions give rise to...

Visa & Passport Requirements for Brazil

Brazil has a reciprocal visa policy with all countries, which means that where visa fees and restrictions are applied to Brazilians visiting a country, Brazil applies the same measures to visitors from that country.Citizens of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela can enter the country...

Accommodation & Hotels in Brazil

The high season in Brazil follows the school holiday calendar, with December and January (summer) being the busiest months. New Year's Eve, Carnival (which can be moved between February and March, see understanding above) and Holy Week are the peak periods and prices can soar, especially in coastal cities...

Things To See in Brazil

A natural wonderAmazon Rainforest - The Amazon basin is home to more than half of the world's remaining rainforest, and more than 60 per cent of it is in northern Brazil - about one billion hectares of incredible biodiversity. The region is home to some 2.5 million species of...

Things To Do in Brazil

CarnivalThe world's biggest festival takes place every year throughout the country and lasts for almost a week in February or early March. It is celebrated in a variety of ways, from the giant Boneco masks in Olinda and the Trios Elétricos in Salvador to the huge samba parades in...

Food & Drinks in Brazil

Food in BrazilBrazilian cuisine is as diverse as its geography and culture. On the other hand, some may find it a half-baked concoction, and everyday dishes can be bland and monotonous. Although there are some fairly unique dishes of regional origin, many dishes have been brought by immigrants from...

Money & Shopping in Brazil

CurrencyThe Brazilian unit of currency is the real (pronounced "hay-AHL"), plural reais ("hay-ICE"), abbreviated BRL, or simply R$. One real is divided into 100 centavos. To illustrate how prices are written, R$1.50 means one real and fifty centavos.Foreign currency such as US dollars or euros can be exchanged at...

Festivals & Holidays in Brazil

Brazil has the following 13 public holidays:New Year - 1 JanuaryCarnival - February/March (moveable - 7 weeks before Easter. Monday and Tuesday are the actual public holidays, but the festivities usually start on Saturday and last until Ash Wednesday at noon, when shops and services reopen).Holy Week - March/April...

Traditions & Customs in Brazil

Brazilians tend to be very open and talk freely about their problems, including political and other issues. They also use a lot of self-deprecating humour. This allows you to make jokes about Brazil's problems when they talk about these topics, in a playful way. When you point out something...

Internet & Communications in Brazil

By telephoneBrazil has an international telephone code of 55 and two-digit area codes, and telephone numbers are eight or nine digits long. Some regions used seven digits until 2006, which means you can still find old phone numbers that don't work unless you add another digit. (Most of the...

Language & Phrasebook in Brazil

The official language of Brazil is Portuguese, which is spoken by the entire population (with the exception of some very remote tribes). In fact, Brazil has been home to immigrants from all parts of the world for centuries, whose descendants now speak Portuguese as their mother tongue.Brazilian Portuguese has...

History Of Brazil

Before Christopher Columbus arrived in the Americas, the region now known as Brazil was home to people belonging mainly to the Tupi and Guarani ethnic groups. Colonisation by the Portuguese began in the late 16th century with the extraction of the valuable wood of the Pau Brasil tree, from...

Stay Safe & Healthy in Brazil

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