Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Language & Phrasebook in Poland

EuropePolandLanguage & Phrasebook in Poland

Read next

Poland’s official language is Polish.

Foreign tourists should be informed that almost all government information is typically only available in Polish. Street signs, instructions, information signs, and so forth are often exclusively in Polish, as are train and bus timetables and announcements (airports and a few major train stations seem to be an exception to this). Signs in various languages are usually seen exclusively at major tourist sites when it comes to information signs like museums, churches, and so on.

The majority of young people and adolescents are fluent in English. Because English is taught from a relatively young age (some schools begin as early as four years old), only Poles who grow up in remote towns or villages will be denied English instruction. Older Poles, particularly those living outside of the major cities, will speak little or no English. However, it is very likely that they speak French, German, or Russian (however, if you use Russian when asking a Pole, say first that you don’t know Polish and that’s why you speak Russian – taking Russian as an official language of Poland is considered an offense as a result of Russian occupation and communist times), which were taught in schools as the main foreign languages until the 1990s.

Russian, which has many parallels with Polish, has mostly been replaced by English, although German is still taught in many schools across the nation, and is particularly popular in the western regions. Ukrainian and Polish have numerous commonalities.

In Poland, a few words may go a long way. Unlike in some other tourist locations, where locals laugh at how poor a foreigner’s usage of the native language is, Polish people usually appreciate the few foreigners who acquire or attempt to learn Polish, even if it is just a few phrases. Younger Poles will also take advantage of the opportunity to improve their English. Be aware that if you are heard speaking English in public outside of major cities and tourist regions, individuals may listen in to practice their English.

Make an effort to learn how to pronounce the names of locations. Because Polish has a fairly consistent pronunciation, this should be no issue. Although most English speakers are unfamiliar with a few sounds, knowing every phoneme is not necessary to attain intelligibility; capturing the spirit is more important.

Poland’s recent history has resulted in a very homogeneous society today, in stark contrast to its long history of ethno-religious diversity; nearly 99 percent of the population today is ethnic Polish; prior to World War II, it was only 69 percent with large minorities, primarily Ukrainians, Belorussians, and Germans, and less than two-thirds Roman Catholic with large Orthodox and Protestant minorities as well.

Poland also had the biggest Jewish community in Europe, with estimates ranging from 10% to 30% of the Polish population at the time. Outside of the main cities’ most touristic districts, you’ll encounter few, if any, foreigners. The majority of immigrants in Poland (mostly Ukrainians and Vietnamese) work in the larger cities. Poland’s tiny collection of current ethnic minorities, Germans, Ukrainians, Belorussians, Silesians, and Kashubians, all speak Polish, and few regional languages survive except in the south and around the Baltic coast.

How To Travel To Poland

By plane The majority of Europe's major airlines fly into and out of Poland. LOT Polish Airlines is Poland's national airline and a Star Alliance member, running the Miles&More frequent flyer program with many other European Star Alliance members. Most other European legacy carriers retain at least one link to...

How To Travel Around Poland

The Polish road system is vast but usually in bad condition, and the high-speed highways that are presently in existence are inadequate. However, public transportation is abundant and reasonably priced: buses and trams in towns, and charter buses and trains for long-distance travel. By plane LOT Polish Airlines has domestic flights...

Visa & Passport Requirements for Poland

Poland is a signatory to the Schengen Agreement. Border restrictions are usually not required between nations that have signed and implemented the pact. This covers the majority of the European Union as well as a few additional nations. Before boarding foreign planes or boats, passengers' identities are typically checked. Temporary border...

Destinations in Poland

Regions in Poland Central Poland (Łódzkie, Mazowieckie)Central Poland is centered around Warsaw, the capital city, and ód, a major city with a strong textile industry history. Southern Poland (Małopolskie, Śląskie)The region is home to magnificent mountain ranges, the world's oldest working salt mines, breathtaking landscapes, caverns, historical sites, and towns. The beautiful medieval...

Accommodation & Hotels in Poland

When it comes to accommodation availability and quality, Poland is catching up with Western Europe. Following the Euro 2012 championships, the situation in Euro host towns is now similar to that of most other cities in Northern and Western Europe. Many smaller cities and places that are less visited...

Things To See in Poland

Since Poland's accession to the European Union, foreign visitors have quickly rediscovered the country's rich cultural history, magnificent historic monuments, and simply breathtaking variety of landscapes. Whether it's architecture, urban atmosphere, or a sense of the past, Poland's busy cities and villages provide something for everyone. If you want...

Food & Drinks in Poland

Food in Poland Poles eat according to the typical continental schedule: a modest breakfast (generally some sandwiches with tea/coffee), a bigger lunch (or historically a "dinner") at about 13:00-14:00, and a supper at around 19:00. Many restaurants provide at least one vegetarian meal, making it easy to forgo meat. Most large...

Money & Shopping in Poland

Paying The Polish zoty (z, international abbreviation: PLN) is the legal currency in Poland. The zoty is split into 100 groszy (check the box to details). Poland was anticipated to adopt the Euro (€) after 2014, but such plans are still in the works. Private currency exchange offices (Polish: kantor) are...

Festivals & Holidays in Poland

A variety of holidays, including several (Catholic) religious festivals and many significant anniversaries, have been recognized as public by legislation, as mentioned below. Most service and retail shops, other businesses, museums, galleries, other attractions, and government offices are obliged to shut completely on certain days. Plan ahead of time...

Internet & Communications in Poland

Mobile phones Plus (code 260 01), T-Mobile (previously ERA) (260 02), Orange (260 03), and Play are the four mobile phone carriers in Poland (260 06). The typical European GSM 900/1800 MHz network covers about 98 percent of the nation, with the remaining 2 percent being nature reserves or high...

Traditions & Customs in Poland

Etiquette In terms of gender etiquette, Poles are typically conservative. It is usual for males to hold doors and seats open for ladies. When greeting or saying farewell, some men, especially elderly males, may kiss a woman's hand. Kissing a woman's hand is considered gallant by some, although it is...

Culture Of Poland

Poland's culture is inextricably linked to its complex 1,000-year history. Its distinct personality arose as a consequence of its geographical location at the crossroads of European civilizations. With its roots in Proto-Slavic civilization, Polish culture has been deeply impacted throughout time by its intertwining connections with the Germanic, Latinate,...

History Of Poland

Early history The earliest towns in modern-day Poland, Kalisz and Elblg on the Amber Trail to the Baltic Sea, were recorded by Roman authors in the first century AD, while the first Polish settlement in Biskupin goes back much earlier, to the seventh century BC. Poland became a nation in the...

Stay Safe & Healthy in Poland

In Poland, the European unified emergency number 112 is being used. It currently works for all mobile phone calls and the majority of landline calls. In addition, three "ancient" emergency numbers are still in operation. They are as follows: Ambulance: 999 (Pogotowie, dziewięć-dziewięć-dziewięć)Firefighters: 998 (Straż Pożarna, dziewięć-dziewięć-osiem)Police: 997 (Policja, dziewięć-dziewięć-siedem)Municipal Guards: 986 (Straż...

Asia

Africa

South America

Europe

North America

Most Popular