Tuesday, October 26, 2021

Internet & Communications in Norway

EuropeNorwayInternet & Communications in Norway

Mobile phone coverage is ubiquitous in metropolitan areas and usually excellent in rural Norway, but certain rural valley regions may be underserved on occasion.

Even at the most distant mountain cottages, if they are manned, you may generally send a postcard.

Internet

Because most Norwegian homes are linked to the Internet in some manner (typically through broadband), cybercafés are difficult to locate outside of large cities owing to a limited market. Most public libraries provide free internet access to the public, albeit with a restricted number of computers and hours of operation.

If you have a laptop with a wireless connection, you will discover wireless internet zones almost everywhere (gas stations, city centers, cafés, shopping malls, hotels, and so on). But be prepared to pay for it. It is fairly uncommon for hotels to have a terminal available for guests to use. Around 60% of camp sites offer Wi-Fi Internet, however if it’s important to you, inquire before purchasing for your camping spot.

Telenor (the national telecommunications operator) offers pre-paid SIM cards for NOK49, which give rapid 4G internet access with a daily limit of NOK10. Unless you buy an additional data plan (extra NOK49 / 500MB), speed is decreased after 500MB in a month. This SIM card costs NOK199 in Telenor shops (including the one at the airport), however it is available for NOK49 at convenience stores. On-line activation needs a Norwegian ID, however Telenor shops may do it quickly and for free for foreigners with the display of a passport. (Prices current as of May 2014)

As of August 2011, Telenor (the national telecommunications operator) offers prepaid wireless 3G internet dongles for PCs (NOK700, approximately €100). A NOK150 buy-in is required with the dongle, which comes with NOK50 credit and 300MB of data to be utilized in four days. Then, another NOK150 is required to buy 15 days of unrestricted internet access. 3G speeds are quite useable, and if 3G service is not available, the dongle automatically switches to 2G. (not so much fun). Of course, all pricing and terms are subject to change at any time. There is a mobile phone store (landside) at Oslo Airport that offers phone equipment.

There are alternative carriers; NetCom (part of the TeliaSonera group) has somewhat less coverage than Telenor but lower costs; NOK150 gets you a data-only SIM with 1GB data at 4G speeds for a week, NOK29 gets you 500MB for a day, NOK200 gets you 2GB/2 weeks, and NOK300 gets you 4GB/month. Packages for voice include 1GB+talk/text for NOK199, 3GB+talk/text for NOK299, and 6GB+talk/text for NOK399.