Saturday, February 24, 2024
Giza Travel Guide - Travel S Helper

Giza

travel guide

Giza is Egypt’s third-largest metropolis. It’s 20 kilometers (12.43 miles) southwest of Cairo, on the west bank of the Nile. The five cities of Greater Cairo are Cairo Governorate, Shubra El-Kheima, Helwan, 6th October City, and Obour. Giza is the capital of the Giza Governorate and is situated on the governorate’s northeast boundary in coordinates. It is situated on the banks of the Nile River. In the 2006 national census, the city had a population of 2,681,863, while the governorate had a population of 6,272,571. It was the world’s second biggest suburb in 2006, tied with Incheon, South Korea, and Quezon City, Philippines, and second only to Yokohama, Japan, due to its high population.

Giza is best known for the Giza Plateau, which is home to some of the world’s most impressive ancient monuments, including the Great Sphinx, the Great Pyramid of Giza, and a number of other large pyramids and temples, as well as a complex of ancient Egyptian royal mortuary and sacred structures, including the Great Sphinx, the Great Pyramid of Giza, and a number of other large pyramids and temples. Because of its proximity to Memphis, Egypt’s ancient capital, Giza has long been a major point in the country’s history.

The Prime Meridian, a reference point used to determine a base longitude, was formerly proposed to be located at the Great Pyramid of Giza (1884).

Giza has a hot desert environment similar to an arid climate. Because of its closeness to Cairo, it has a climate similar to that of Cairo. During the months of March and April, wind storms are common in Egypt, bringing Saharan dust into the city. In the winter, high temperatures vary from 16 °C (61 °F) to 20 °C (68 °F), with overnight lows below 7 °C (45 °F). Summer highs are about 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit), with lows around 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit). Rain is uncommon in Giza, while snow and cold temperatures are uncommon.

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Giza | Introduction

Giza – Info Card

POPULATION :  3,628,062
FOUNDED :   642 AD
TIME ZONE :   EST (UTC+2)
LANGUAGE :  Arabic (official), English and French widely understood by educated classes
RELIGION :  Muslim (mostly Sunni) 90%, Coptic 9%, other Christian 1%
AREA :  1,579.75 km2 (609.94 sq mi)
ELEVATION :  19 m (62 ft)
COORDINATES :  30°01′N 31°13′E
SEX RATIO :  Male: 50.22
 Female: 49.78
ETHNIC :  Egyptian 99.6%, other 0.4%
AREA CODE :
POSTAL CODE :
DIALING CODE :  (+20) 2
WEBSITE :  official website

Tourism in Giza

Beyond downtown Cairo, the city of Giza is noteworthy as a supplementary – and increasingly popular – alternative for tourists seeking food, lodging, and entertainment. The majority of these services are situated along the main thoroughfare in the area, Pyramids Road.

The Grand Museum of Egypt (the competition-winning design designed by an Irish architectural team headed by Shih-Fu Peng), the long-awaited principal successor for the long-standing Egyptian Museum in Midan Tahrir, will ultimately be built on the desert plateau of Giza, near to the Pyramids. The project is expected to be completed in 2015.

All of Giza’s noteworthy attractions are focused on the Giza Plateau, which is located at the end of Pyramids Road. Some visitors are surprised to see the top of a Pyramid come up above the golden arches of a McDonalds with an Arabic sign as they walk down a street in Giza; your imagination of pyramids coming up out of an empty desert may differ from reality.

There are two ticket offices: one at the main entrance and the other near Sphinx in the Plateau’s eastern section. If you take the second one early in the morning, you will escape the throng and have the opportunity to visit the Sphinx region alone and in peace. The entrance fee to the site is LE 60, with the Pyramid of Menkaure costing another LE 30 and the Great Pyramid of Khufu costing another LE 100. Student IDs will come in helpful, since they will get you a 50% discount. The inside of the pyramids is hot, humid, and claustrophobic, with steep, dusty corridors that are difficult to navigate, and individuals with heart or lung problems or a physical disability should avoid them. At any one moment, only two of the three pyramids are exposed to the public, while the third is being rebuilt, and they alternate every two years. It may, however, be an intriguing and informative experience for those prepared to withstand these circumstances. Seeing the inside walls and passageways of the pyramids firsthand heightens one’s understanding for the monumental task that the architects of these ancient monuments undertook. Cameras are not permitted within the pyramids. Visiting the Pyramid of Menkaure is a very comparable experience to visiting the greater pyramid, however it is much less expensive.

  • Great Pyramid of Khufu (Cheops) – The Great Pyramid of Khufu (Cheops) is the final remaining example of the Ancient World’s Seven Wonders, initially standing at 146 meters (479 feet) but now reduced to a still impressive 137 meters (449 feet). Over 2 million stone blocks were utilized in the construction of this structure, which was entirely done by hand.
  • Solar Barque Museum – Located right next to the Great Pyramid’s southern face, this museum features an excavated and recreated “solar boat” that was buried with the Pharaoh for use on his daily trip with the sun across the sky.
  • Pyramid of Khafre (Chephren) – The Pyramid of Khafre (Chephren) is somewhat smaller than the Great Pyramid, however it seems bigger from certain perspectives because to its excellent location on the desert plateau.
  • Pyramid of Menkaure (Mycerinus) – Menkaure’s (Mycerinus) Pyramid is the smallest of the Giza Pyramids, standing at 62 meters (203 feet) (originally 66.5 m)
  • Sphinx and the Temple of the Sphinx – the ancient Egyptians thought of the huge, reclining human-headed lion as the sun deity Re-Horakhty – “Horus of the Horizon.” The Egyptians call it Abu el-Hol, the “Father of Terror,” while the Greek term Sphinx means “Strangler.” The Sphinx is substantially smaller than the Pyramids around it, measuring 45 meters long and 22 meters broad and carved from a one massive piece of sandstone. The disappearing nose is blamed on boredom by tired troops, which is typically blamed on British soldiers in World War I or Napoleon’s forces in 1798, although 18th-century paintings show the nose already gone, placing the finger to the occupying Turks.
  • Various Queens’ Pyramids and Nobles’ Tombs surround the royal pyramids in organized cemeteries. The Tomb of Seshemnufer IV, in particular, can be explored from the inside, where you may descend to the sarcophagus and get a sense of how it appears. Because this isn’t the major attraction, there aren’t many visitors, which makes this a fascinating visit.

The Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities closes them to the public at least one at a time for conservation and repair procedures, therefore not all of the Pyramids are equally accessible for interior research.

Climbing the Pyramids, which was once a famous tourist attraction, is now both illegal and highly hazardous; numerous travelers have died while trying it. Some Pyramid guards have been known to turn a blind eye in exchange for baksheesh in less-frequented places, although this practice is highly discouraged since it has a detrimental influence on the pyramids. At night, however, it is very simple to get access to the Giza complex, and Khufu’s Great Pyramid may be scaled rather simply from the South-West corner. This is, however, still hazardous and unlawful.

Arrive to the Pyramids as soon as they open, since tour bus traffic and (in the summer) the heat rapidly overcrowd the sights, making it impossible to properly appreciate them.

Outside of the gate checks, do not offer your ticket to anybody. You’ll need to present it to get through the metal detectors at the Pyramids and Sphinx areas, as well as to enter the Pyramid if you want to pay for it. Many people will approach you and claim (true or false?) to work for the government, then ask to see/grab the ticket, take it, and attempt to start a tour for you. Don’t assume they’re legitimate simply because they’re doing it in front of the cops. They want to quickly explain things and then want a gratuity. Don’t give up your ticket, and don’t be scared to speak out and decline a tip. If you wish to take a tour, the better ones may be arranged ahead of time and will provide you with more precise information about what you’re viewing. (One of their favorite hiding spots is among the tombs outside the Great Pyramid.)

How To Travel To Giza

Get In - BY METRO

Metro Line 2 presently connects Cairo and Giza, however it does not reach the Pyramids. Take a train to Giza station (not the end!). The pyramids are an 8-kilometer, 15-20-minute drive southwest on the lengthy Al-Haram Boulevard, which the train traverses immediately before arriving at the station. That’s basically a “right turn” from the path you’ve been on. The facility (known as el-hàràm) is served by a variety of minibuses and buses, including the green public 900 and 997 buses.

Remember that the metro, particularly the Giza line, is constantly busy at peak hours, and that it is usually only open from 6 a.m. to 11:30 p.m., unless there are extraordinary circumstances.

Get In - BY TAXI

The Pyramids may be closer than you realize, so you can take a cab from any section of Cairo to the Pyramids for a low price, and it’s surely the quickest and simplest route. There are two possibilities for this: unmetered and metered:

Meters are not used in older black and white cabs, so be prepared to bargain. Taxi drivers will almost always want to take you to their “brother’s” perfume store or “father’s” carpet warehouse on the way – if you don’t want to spend time doing this, and being put on the position to make a purchase – simply make it plain that you just want to view the antiques.

Taxis in solid yellow and white are metered and air conditioned. You might spare yourself the trouble by taking the black and white cabs listed above, which are about the same price, if not less, depending on your competence. On the other side, there have been reports of white and yellow taxi drivers fixing the meters, which is not unexpected given that it occurs all around the globe.

Get In - BY BUS

Be aware that buses doesn’t always arrive on time.

The best method to go to the Giza Pyramids via public transportation from urban Cairo is to take bus lines 355 or 357 – a spacious white, air-conditioned coach with CTA (Cairo Transport Authority) on the side. Every two-thirds of an hour, between the airport and Heliopolis. Unless you wave to it, the bus normally never stops at the Abdel Menem Riyad station in Midan Tahrir, near to the Egyptian Museum, before going on to Giza and the Pyramids. Tickets are LE 2 – a bargain!

Make sure you ask the driver whether the bus is taking its usual route/going where you want to go, since occasionally they don’t due to heavy traffic or being more than 15 minutes late for their estimated arrival time.

A less expensive option, but less dependable, unless you can sometimes rush after the bus and stand inside an extremely full vehicle. By taking the regular buses 900 or 997, which cost 50 piastres (half a pound) and depart from the large central bus terminal beneath the overpasses near the museum. There are three lanes, with the one closest to the rundown controllers’ booth serving as the starting point (as of late July 2010). When it comes to going down, most individuals will be honest and helpful, but you may run with fraudsters who will lead you to their camels instead of the pyramids. The exact location for 997 is down a lengthy avenue, after you’ve seen the Pyramids and the bus has done a U-turn and then turned left – get off when you see a blue sign for the Light and Sound show.

Sights & Landmarks In Giza

All of Giza’s noteworthy attractions are focused on the Giza Plateau, which is located at the end of Pyramids Road. Some people are taken aback when they go along a street in Giza and witness the top of a Pyramid rise over the golden arches of a McDonald’s with an Arabic sign – your perception of pyramids rising from an empty desert may differ from reality.

There are two ticket offices: one is located at the main entrance, while the other is located near the Sphinx on the Plateau’s eastern section. If you take the second one in the morning, you’ll miss the throng and have the opportunity to visit the Sphinx region in peace and quiet. The site entrance fee is LE 60, and admission to the pyramids costs an additional LE 30 for the Pyramid of Menkaure and LE 100 for the Great Pyramid of Khufu. Student IDs will come in useful, since they will entitle you to a 50% discount. The inside of the pyramids is hot, humid, and somewhat claustrophobic, with steep, dusty passageways that are difficult to navigate, and individuals with heart or lung problems or a physical disability should avoid it. At any one moment, only two pyramids are exposed to the public, while the third is being rebuilt, and they alternate every two years. However, for those prepared to withstand these circumstances, it may be an informative and intriguing experience. Seeing the inside walls and passageways of the pyramids firsthand heightens one’s admiration for the enormous feat of the architects of these ancient buildings. Cameras are not permitted within the pyramids. For those on a budget, visiting the Pyramid of Menkaure provides an experience comparable to that of the greater pyramid at a fraction of the cost.

  • The Great Pyramid of Khufu (Cheops) Is the last surviving representation of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, initially standing at 146 meters (479 feet) but currently standing at a still-awe-inspiring 137 meters (449 feet). This building was constructed entirely by hand using over 2 million stone pieces.
  • Solar Barque Museum – Located just below the Great Pyramid’s southern face, this museum features an excavated and recreated “solar boat” that was buried beside the Pharaoh for use on his daily trip with the sun across the sky. LE 40.
  • The Pyramid of Khafre (Chephren) is somewhat smaller than the Great Pyramid, however it seems bigger from certain angles because to its superior location on the desert plateau.
  • Menkaure’s Pyramid (Mycerinus) is the smallest of the Giza Pyramids, standing at 62 meters (203 feet) tall (originally 66.5 m)
  • Sphinx and Sphinx Temple – The ancient Egyptians thought of the gigantic, reclining human-headed lion as the sun deity Re-Horakhty – “Horus of the horizon.” The Egyptians refer to it as Abu el-Hol, the “Father of Terror,” and even the Greeks refer to it as Sphinx, which translates as “Strangler.” The Sphinx is substantially smaller than the Pyramids surrounding it, measuring 45 meters long and 22 meters broad and carved from an one massive piece of sandstone. The missing nose is generally attributed to bored troops engaging in target practice, and is sometimes attributed to British soldiers during World War I or Napoleon’s forces in 1798, however 18th-century pictures show the nose already gone, pointing the finger to the occupying Turks.
  • Numerous Queens’ Pyramids and Nobles’ Tombs, all set inside regimented cemeteries next to the royal pyramids. Particularly the Tomb of Seshemnufer IV, which may be explored from the inside, where you can descend to the sarcophagus and get a sense of its appearance. Due to the fact that this is not the primary objective, there are few visitors, which adds to the attraction of this visit.

Not all of the Pyramids are equally accessible for internal research, since the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities closes them to the public for conservation and repair purposes at least one at a time.

Although climbing the Pyramids was once a popular tourist pastime, it is now both legally prohibited and exceedingly hazardous – numerous travelers have perished in the effort. While some guards have been known to turn a blind eye in exchange for baksheesh in less-frequented places, this practice has a detrimental effect on the pyramids and is severely prohibited. However, trespassing into the Giza complex at night is rather straightforward, and Khufu’s Great Pyramid may be ascended relatively quickly from the south-western corner. This, however, is still hazardous and unlawful.

It’s prudent to come to the Pyramids immediately upon its opening, since tour bus activity and (in the summer) the heat rapidly overwhelm the sights, making them impossible to experience properly.

Outside of the gate checks, do not offer your ticket to anybody. You must present it to pass through the metal detectors at the entrances to the Pyramids and Sphinx areas, as well as to access the Pyramid if you purchase that ticket. Numerous individuals will approach you and claim (true or falsely?) to work for the government, then want to see/grab the ticket/grab it, then take it and attempt to start the tour for you. Do not believe that they are legitimate just because they are doing this in front of the cops. They want to quickly explain things and then want a gratuity. Refuse to surrender your ticket and do not be scared to stand up for yourself and decline tipping. If you wish to take a tour, the better ones may be booked in advance and will provide you with more precise information on what you are viewing. (One of their favorite hiding places is beside the tombs outside the Great Pyramid.)

See Giza with children

The Giza Plateau for Kids

The Giza Plateau has more to offer children than any other place on Earth. As you approach the ancient marvels, they take your breath away.

The Pyramids of Giza for Kids

The Giza pyramids are kind of pricey to see. Each pyramid has its own ticket. The office clerk will inform you that the area ticket is acceptable, but it is not. The area ticket provides access to the Sphinx and the region around the pyramids. Each pyramid requires a separate ticket. The Great Pyramid of Khufu and Khafre’s Pyramid are the only pyramids worth seeing.

Simply for curiosity’s sake, the Great Pyramid of Khufu is worth viewing. After seeing the big pyramid’s outside, it’s natural to desire to examine the inside. One thing is certain about that pyramid: it provides excellent workout. It’s really worth seeing since all of the hieroglyphics remain intact, and unless you’re an expert at deciphering hieroglyphics, it’s a fantastic mystery. Even if you are unable to understand it, you will enjoy the elaborately carved figures.

Khafre’s pyramid is the kind of pyramid that the majority of people are familiar with today. The Great Pyramid of Khufu’s pyramid architecture is characterized by the proximity of the tomb to the pyramid’s summit. Khafre’s sarcophagus is located underground. To visit his grave, you must really descend under the pyramid. Although his corpse is missing from both pyramids.

Minakure’s pyramid is not very interesting to see. However, if you’re on a budget, this is the greatest option. The admission fee to the pyramid is 30 Egyptian pounds, or about $6 USD. The pyramid resembles a miniature replica of Khufu’s Great Pyramid.

Bear in mind that seeing the pyramids will take the whole day.

The Egyptian Museum for Kids

The Egyptian Museum has a great deal to offer children. The Mummy Room is the most intriguing. The Mummy Room admission fee is 100 Egyptian Pounds. However, after all, it is unquestionably worth it. The mummy chamber has around 15 distinct mummies. One feature of the mummies is their little stature.

The Sound and Light Show for Kids

The pyramid sound and light display is one of the most engaging activities for children in the area. You may see the pyramids in the dark or in quiet prior to the show’s start. Normally, the cacophony of visitors and sellers is constant. The tale of music and light is similar to that of a book. The Sphinx serves as both the background and storyteller of a lengthy narrative. The sceneries are projected onto the pyramids, and the various pyramids are illuminated.

Things To Do In Giza

Before you get on a camel or horse, have a look at how the operators handle their animals. You may alter your mind. If you do decide to accept one of the horsemen’s or camel men’s offers, be careful to negotiate the price and the location beforehand. Inquire to ensure that it covers two people/two horses. Negotiate the price that you want. When you return to the agreed-upon location, dismount the horse/camel, deliver the guy the agreed-upon money, and walk away. They will devise various schemes to extort further money from you. If you are satisfied and desire to leave a tip, do so at your discretion. Do not feel compelled to make more contributions. Simply walk away. They will not pursue you.

Camel rides

If at all possible, avoid taking a camel ride around the Pyramids; the experience is loud, stinky, and overrated. If you must, there are many better spots in Egypt to take a camel ride. Things are run a bit better than they used to be, and the practice of bringing visitors out into the desert and refusing to return until “tipped” is becoming more unusual.

Horse riding

Go horseback riding in the desert to feel the spirit of the Egyptian horses as well as the genuine magnificence of the Pyramids as viewed from beyond the ‘circus ring’ wall. However, be wary of touts; it’s advisable to ride from one of the higher-quality stables, such as FB Stables. Riding under the shadow of the Great Pyramids or venturing farther afield on a half-day tour to Saqqara or Abu Sir, or camping out overnight with a grill and fire.

The Sound and Light performance may also be seen from FB’s rooftop patio! If you ride with a tout (which they will encourage you to do if the area is closed for entry, for example), they will claim that you will have a great view of the pyramids (which you will not), charge you a fortune, ride at high speed through the streets without a helmet (or any regard for safety), demand a tip as you ride back, and try to take you to a’museum,’ which is actually a shop (where you will be pressured to buy stuff).

See the sunrise

View the dawn and the first light rays coloring the Pyramids from the terrace on the third floor of a café or the roof terrace of the hostel located near the second western entrance and ticket office.

FB Stables

FB Stables, Gamal Abdul Nasser St, Sphinx (Turn left after the sphinx KFC, then right in Gamal Abdul Nasser Street. FB is the last stables on the left),  +20 106 507 0288. Karim at FB Stables is popular with expatriates who keep their horses at livery, but he’s also wonderful for a “tourist” style ride to see the Pyramids and Sphinx from the desert. Longer journeys to Saqqara and Abu Sir, as well as dawn, sunset, and moonlight rides, may be scheduled in advance. Aside from the horses and nice company, one of the finest aspects of FB is their beautiful rooftop patio (with BBQ) with unrivaled views of the Pyramids – a perfect location to unwind with a drink while watching the Sound and Light displays. At FB stables, there is no slapping or beating of the horses. Aside from the fantastic vacation, the shisha, and Karim’s incredible support, it was a safe location to say yes without being ripped off later! The second stables at FB’s Abu Sir are also quite pleasant!

Pyramids Sound and Light Show (Son-et-Lumière)

Admission: foreign languages shows LE 130, 90, 75 with discounted 45 ticket only available in the 75 section. The LE 130 and LE 90 tickets are for the first and second to third rows, respectively, and may not be worth the extra cost. Arabic show LE 11, foreign language private shows LE 65 + LE 300 (covers running costs), Arabic private show LE 16.50 + LE 150 Although little cheesy and usually wrong in historical accuracy, this is a good evening activity. As a spectacular laser show pulls out the features of the Pyramids and portrays historical images on the side of the Great Pyramid itself, the “voice of the Sphinx” explains the history of the Giza Plateau and its significance in Egyptian history.

If you dine at the Pizza Hut restaurant close outside the entrance to the Sound and Light Performance, you may be invited to view the show from the restaurant’s roof in exchange for a modest tip. While it isn’t as wonderful as seeing it from within the walls, it is amazing value for money. As of November 2009, incredibly bright lights were directed onto the top of the Pizza Hut and other buildings in order to entice guests to attend the spectacle. They directed projection lights towards the Pizza Hut, making it difficult to see anything. Pizza Hut has responded by erecting a barrier on the roof in an attempt to obscure the light.

Food & Restaurants In Giza

There are a lot of Western fast food alternatives just opposite the main admission gates to the Pyramid enclosure, including Pizza Hut and KFC, so you can munch on a Tower burger and drink on a soda in air-conditioned comfort while staring over the road at the 4,000+ year-old Sphinx! Many people may prefer a more realistic experience, although the novelty of the circumstance may be appealing.

  • Fish Market, 26 Shar’a al-Nil (Along the Nile, in the same),   +20 2 570 9694.This restaurant is situated on the Nile aboard a moored ship, next to a TGI Friday’s. Popular with both residents and tourists, however the cuisine is subpar, the prices are exorbitant, and the service is erratic. Moderate to Extreme.
  • Khan El Khalili, Mena House Oberoi hotel. The restaurant has been operating for almost a century and is by far the most fashionable spot for lunch or a cool drink. Expect to pay Western pricing for this luxury.
  • Moghul Room, Mena House Oberoi. An very premium Indian restaurant. Reservations are required.
  • Nile Pharos (Dinner cruise), 138 El Nile St.. The boat is decorated in Pharaonic style and has a buffet with foreign and Egyptian cuisine as well as belly dance.
  • Nile City, Zamalek. The Stationary Boat on the Nile is home to various foreign businesses as well as an Egyptian grill and a seafood restaurant. Chilis, Johny Carinos, Fish Market, and Studio Misr are just a few of the restaurants in the area.

Stay Safe & Healthy In Giza

The Giza Pyramids, Egypt’s largest tourist attraction, draw millions of visitors each year. They also draw a significant number of the most determined opportunists from a long distance away. Report any harassment by camel drivers or tourist touts to the black-uniformed (or white-uniformed in the summer) Tourist Police immediately, and be prepared for a variety of potential scams, including “advice” from official-looking individuals that an attraction is closed or has an alternate entrance. Also, be aware that any “favor” of any type (providing directions, being shown anything, etc.) may be done in anticipation of a tip, so be wary when accepting unsolicited aid (though don’t let excessive caution ruin your vacation; you may also meet real kindness). Also, be in mind that certain Tourist Police officers may frequently offer to assist you in exchange for a tip. Many well-known fraudsters will operate directly in front of tourist police, who are either complicit or refuse to interfere.

Tips To Avoid Harassment

If you’re alone, headphones let you avoid the relentless “Hello, where are you from my buddy” conversation starters. Smiling and pointing at the headphones also appears to work.

Avoid establishing eye contact, beginning discussions, or accepting any assistance with taking or posing for photographs for you—they will regard you as an easy target for harassment.

Saying “La Shukran” (No thanks) indicates you know a little more than the ordinary visitor and will not be seen as hostile or impolite. Smiling while you say it doesn’t harm since it doesn’t seem as an invitation to chat, but it indicates you’re not trying to offend.

Additional Useful Safety Tips

When picking a native horse or camel ride, be careful; you might be taken advantage of or placed in risky circumstances. The “donkey-mafia” that operate near the main entrance will use the most “persuasive” and frequently forceful ways to get you aboard their animals, and they don’t seem to comprehend the meaning of the word “No.” When you say no and have to get off them, they will make such a commotion that you will have to pay for the pleasure of denying their hospitality. NOTE: During the revolution, some of these persons were part in the Battle of the Camels, which resulted in the deaths of innocent citizens. Use according to your conscience.

Climbing any of the Pyramids is strictly prohibited and highly hazardous!

Take lots of bottled water with you, as you would anyplace else in Egypt, particularly during the warmer months, and wear a hat and sunscreen—sunglasses are also a good idea!

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