Saturday, February 24, 2024
Aswan Travel Guide - Travel S Helper

Aswan

travel guide

Aswan, originally called Assuan, is the capital of the Aswan Governorate in Egypt’s south. Aswan is a bustling market and tourist destination on the east bank of the Nile at the first cataract, just north of the Aswan Dams. The current metropolis has grown to encompass the once distinct settlement of Elephantine Island.

Aswan is far more laid-back and intimate than Cairo and Luxor. Aswan is the smallest of the Nile’s three main tourist destinations. Because it is the southernmost of the three, it has a high population of Nubians, who were largely evacuated from their homeland in the Lake Nasser-flooded region. The majority of the Obelisks visible in Luxor were taken from granite quarries near Aswan. The ancient Egyptians used Aswan as their entryway to Africa.

As with the rest of Egypt, Aswan enjoys a scorching desert environment. Summer days in Aswan and Luxor are the hottest of any city in Egypt. Aswan is one of the world’s hottest, sunniest, and driest cities. During the summer (June, July, August, and September), average high temperatures are consistently over 40 °C (104.0 °F), while average low temperatures are constantly above 25 °C (77.0 °F). Summers in the United States are lengthy, hot, and humid.

During the coldest month of the year, average high temperatures stay over 23 °C (73.4 °F), while average low temperatures remain above 8 °C (46.4 °F). Winters are short, sweet, and sweltering. Winter is quite nice and pleasurable, however summer is painfully hot and humid, despite the fact that desert heat is dry.

Aswan’s climate is exceptionally dry all year, with an average annual precipitation of less than 1 mm (0 in). The desert city is one of the driest in the world, and rain doesn’t fall every year; the last time it rained there was seven years ago in early 2001. With an average relative humidity of just 26%, Aswan is one of the least humid cities on the earth, with a high mean of 42 percent in the winter and a lowest mean of 16 percent in the summer.

Aswan has a highly clear, bright, and sunny environment throughout the year, with little seasonal change, and around 4,000 hours of yearly sunlight, which is quite near to the maximum potential sunshine length. Aswan is one of the world’s sunniest cities.

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Aswan | Introduction

Aswan – Info Card

POPULATION :  290,327
FOUNDED : 
TIME ZONE :  EST (UTC+2)
LANGUAGE :  Arabic (official), English and French widely understood by educated classes
RELIGION :  Muslim (mostly Sunni) 90%, Coptic 9%, other Christian 1%
AREA :  (+20) 97
ELEVATION :   194 m (636 ft)
COORDINATES :  24°05′20″N 32°53′59″E
SEX RATIO :  Male: 50.22
 Female: 49.78
ETHNIC :  Egyptian 99.6%, other 0.4%

Tourism in Aswan

Aswan Town And The East Bank

  • Nubian Museum (opposite the Basma Hotel, south of the Old Cataract Hotel, at the southern edge of Aswan town on Sharia Abtal al-Tahrir – approximately a half hour walk from the city centre.). 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Nubian antiquities salvaged before the inundation of Nubia are shown in this well-organized exhibit.
  • Unfinished Obelisk (South of Aswan). The world’s biggest ancient obelisk, cut out of bedrock. It would have been 42 meters (120 feet) long and weighed about 1,200 tons if completed.
  • Fatimid Cemetery (Southern end of Aswan). The dilapidated cemetery bears witness to the Fatimid empire’s fading past splendour.
  • Ferial Gardens (Southern end of Corniche). You must stroll around the Kornish Al Nile (Corniche) at least once while in Aswan. It’s a nice walk, made much better by the fact that you can walk directly into the Ferial Gardens at the southern end. They are a park that is both attractive and calming.

The River And Islands

  • Elephantine Island: Nubian Villages & Aswan Museum. This island is home to the Nubian settlements of Siou and Koti. The Nilometers and the Temples of Sati, Khnum (ancient rams-head divinity), and Pepinakht-Heqaib are also located here. On the island, there is a Movenpick resort. The Aswan Museum, located on the island’s southern tip, contains artifacts discovered during Elephantine Island excavations.
  • Aswan Botanical Gardens (On the entirety of Kitcheners Island to the west of Elephantine Island). In the 1890s, Lord Kitchener, who owned the 6.8-hectare island, turned it into a botanical park. Hundreds of plant species and palm trees may be found here, as well as birds. A Felucca trip is required to get there.
  • Seheyl Island (Just north of the old Aswan Dam). 7AM to 4:00PM. Friendly Nubian villages. It is well-known for its beautiful beaded jewelry. The Famine Stela is also located here. More than 200 inscriptions from the 18th dynasty may be found on this cliff.

West Bank

  • Tombs of the Nobles. 8AM to 4:00PM. Princes’ rock-hewn graves from the Old Kingdom to the Roman era may be found on the northern highlands of the west bank. Important biographical writings may be found in the tombs of the 6th Dynasty, some of which constitute connected family complexes. The tombs are adorned on the inside with vibrant wall murals depicting daily scenes, hieroglyphic biographies, and inscriptions detailing the noblemen’s trips into Africa.
  • Kubbet el-Hawa (on top of the hill above the Tombs of the Nobles). A local sheikh and holy man’s little shrine / grave. The hike is rewarded by breathtaking views of Aswan, the Nile River, and the surrounding environment, which are evocatively captured in the place name’s Arabic translation, “the dome of the wind.”
  • Mausoleum of Mohammed Shah Aga Khan (High up in the west bank). Tomb of the Islami sect’s 48th iman and his wife. Although closed to the public, it is visible from the outside.
  • Monastery of St Simeon. October to May: 8AM-4:00PM; June-September:7:00AM-5:00PM. The monastery of St. Simeon has a lengthy history dating back to the 7th century, and it served as a Christian bastion in southern Egypt until Saladin destroyed it in 1173. It formerly housed 300 monks and could accommodate up to 100 pilgrims at a time while it was still in service. The monastery served as a stronghold and was enclosed by a 10 meter high wall. After Saladin’s devastation, it seems that the monastery was never used again. To reach here, take a camel ride or walk from the Noble Tombs.

Around Aswan

  • The High Dam. Despite its importance as a piece of infrastructure, the Aswan High Dam is (to put it mildly) a disappointment, especially for dam fans.
  • Philae Temple (Agilkia Island). This was the final ancient temple created in the traditional Egyptian architectural style, and it was built to worship Isis. The construction of the temple started about 690 BC. Following the inundation of Lake Nasser, it was relocated from its former position on Philae Island to its present location on Agilkia Island. Philae, as well as a number of other temples that currently dot the banks of Lake Nasser, were transported by a large international UNESCO team. A short distance distant, the submerged original island can be seen, accentuated by the steel columns utilized in the relocation procedure. Don’t miss the Sound and Light performance at night, which is the least corny of the Sound and Light “extravaganzas,” as seen in the photo on the right. On your feet, keep an eye out for the incredibly imaginative guards who will do all they can to get into your photographs or point out the hieroglyphics that you can easily see yourself, all for a baksheesh(tip)! The temple was also repurposed as a Christian church, with crosses cut into earlier hieroglyph reliefs and figures of Egyptian gods damaged with care. Graffiti from the 1800s may be found.
  • Kalabsha Temple. This temple and its accompanying remains, like Philae, were relocated by UNESCO to avoid being flooded by Lake Nasser. During Emperor Augustus’ reign, the major temple was dedicated to the Nubian fertility and sun deity Marul. Don’t miss the Kiosk of Qirtasi and Ramesses II’s magnificent Temple of Beit al-Wali.
  • Abu Simbel. The majority of visitors use Aswan as a base to see this magnificent temple. A convoy leaves at 4 a.m. and is generally organized by your travel agency. For further information, see the page on Abu Simbel.
  • Aswan International Sculpture Park. Every spring, the International Sculpture Symposium brings together sculptors from all over the globe to show their work. The pieces are all constructed in Aswan (on the Basma Hotel’s terrace), then transported to this location and displayed next to each other in front of the old quarry.

How To Travel To Aswan

Get In - By Plain

On the west bank, immediately south of the high dam, Aswan International Airport is located 25 kilometers southwest of the city. Because public buses do not run to the airport and security on the approach road to the terminal is strict, it is usually best to use a cab, for which you must pre-arrange a fare. It is possible to get the fee down to LE25, but for most foreigners, LE30 to LE40 is more practical (and simpler).

Air Memphis (to/from Abu Simbel) (VERY terrible quality), Astraeus (to/from London Gatwick), EgyptAir (to/from Abu Simbel, Cairo, Luxor), Iberworld (to/from Madrid), and LotusAir (to/from Cairo) all fly to Aswan International Airport.

Get In - By train

Between Cairo and Aswan, Egypt’s passenger rail service travels along the Nile. On 1st/2nd class AC services, travel time from Luxor is roughly three hours. Each day, five AC express trips depart from Cairo; the travel takes roughly 13–14 hours and costs 57LE for second class and 113LE for first class. In addition, two sleeper trains leave from Cairo’s Ramsis station at 8 p.m. and 9:35 p.m., with fares starting at $60. Tickets tend to sell out quickly, so get them a few days ahead of time.

The Aswan railway station is located on the outskirts of the city, a few hundred meters inland from the Nile. Allow plenty of time to purchase tickets, since counter service is sluggish. There are a number of eateries and modest motels on the blocks between the station and the river, and mini buses leave from outside the station (turn right as you exit the terminal).

Get In - By bus

Buses from Hurghada (513 kilometers) cost 50LE. Tickets are sold on the bus, but make careful to inquire about the price at the ticket office, since the bus ticket salesman may often increase the price by 5LE or more and pocket the difference if you are a foreigner.

Get In - By boat

Every day, many of cruise ships sail from Luxor towards Aswan. These may be booked via travel brokers or directly on the ships. Once a week, a passenger boat operated by the Nile River Valley Transport Corporation departs from Wadi Halfa, Sudan. The journey takes over 24 hours, and first-class tickets with a cabin start at E£385.

How To Get Around In Aswan

Aswan is small enough to be easily navigated on foot. You may take a cab or a horse-drawn carriage to go to Philae, the High Dam, and the unfinished obelisks. A taxi ride to all of these attractions should cost between 80LE and 100LE each car.

You’ll need to cross the river by motor boat or felluca to see the sites on the river islands or on the West Bank. Keep an eye on the pricing, since some operators attempt to overcharge visitors. The cost of using the public boat to the West Bank is about 5LE.

Prices in Aswan

MARKET / SUPERMARKET

Milk 1 liter $0.95
Tomatoes 1 kg $0.45
Cheese 0.5 kg $4.02
Apples 1 kg $1.51
Oranges 1 kg $0.45
Beer (domestic) 0.5 l $0.95
Bottle of Wine 1 bottle $7.00
Coca-Cola 2 liters $0.88
Bread 1 piece $0.33
Water 1.5 l $0.25

RESTAURANTS

Dinner (Low-range) for 2 $11.00
Dinner (Mid-range) for 2 $19.50
Dinner (High-range) for 2 $26.00
Mac Meal or similar 1 meal $4.50
Water 0.33 l $0.25
Cappuccino 1 cup $1.45
Beer (Imported) 0.33 l $1.95
Beer (domestic) 0.5 l $1.05
Coca-Cola 0.33 l $0.40
Coctail drink 1 drink $

ENTERTAINMENT

Cinema 2 tickets $6.00
Gym 1 month $30.00
Men’s Haircut 1 haircut $2.80
Theatar 2 tickets $60.00
Mobile (prepaid) 1 min. $0.03
Pack of Marlboro 1 pack $2.85

PERSONAL CARE

Antibiotics 1 pack $
Tampons 32 pieces $
Deodorant 50 ml. $1.80
Shampoo 400 ml. $2.10
Toilet paper 4 rolls $0.50
Toothpaste 1 tube $0.60

CLOTHES / SHOES

Jeans (Levis 501 or similar) 1 $46.00
Dress summer (Zara, H&M) 1 $34.00
Sport shoes (Nike, Adidas) 1 $74.00
Leather shoes 1 $65.00

TRANSPORTATION

Gasoline 1 liter $0.30
Taxi Start $0.60
Taxi 1 km $0.60
Local Transport 1 ticket $0.30

Sights & Landmarks In Aswan

Aswan Town and the East Bank

  • Nubian Museum (opposite the Basma Hotel, south of the Old Cataract Hotel, at the southern edge of Aswan town on Sharia Abtal al-Tahrir – approximately a half hour walk from the city centre.). daily 9AM-9:00PM. Nubian antiquities salvaged before the inundation of Nubia are shown in this well-organized exhibit.
  • Unfinished Obelisk (South of Aswan). The world’s biggest ancient obelisk, cut out of bedrock. It would have been 42 meters (120 feet) long and weighed about 1,200 tons if completed.
  • Fatimid Cemetery (Southern end of Aswan). The dilapidated cemetery bears witness to the Fatimid empire’s fading past splendour.
  • Ferial Gardens (Southern end of Corniche). You must stroll around the Kornish Al Nile (Corniche) at least once while in Aswan. It’s a nice walk, made much better by the fact that you can walk directly into the Ferial Gardens at the southern end. They are a park that is both attractive and calming.

The River and Islands

  • Elephantine Island: Nubian Villages & Aswan Museum. This island is home to the Nubian settlements of Siou and Koti. The Nilometers and the Temples of Sati, Khnum (ancient rams-head divinity), and Pepinakht-Heqaib are also located here. On the island, there is a Movenpick resort. The Aswan Museum, located on the island’s southern tip, contains artifacts discovered during Elephantine Island excavations.Also, be wary of uninvited local tours, which will culminate in a demand for baksheesh. Locals conduct a frequent boat taxi service to Elephantine Island for just 2LE for one passage, but visitors will be charged more.
  • Aswan Botanical Gardens (On the entirety of Kitcheners Island to the west of Elephantine Island). In the 1890s, Lord Kitchener, who owned the 6.8-hectare island, turned it into a botanical park. Hundreds of plant species and palm trees may be found here, as well as birds. A Felucca trip is required to get there.
  • Seheyl Island (Just north of the old Aswan Dam). 7AM to 4:00PM. Nubian villages are friendly. It is well-known for its beautiful beaded jewelry. The Famine Stela is also located here. More than 200 inscriptions from the 18th dynasty may be found on this cliff.

West Bank

  • Tombs of the Nobles. 8AM to 4:00PM. The western bank’s northern highlands are densely packed with rock-hewn graves of rulers dating from the Old Kingdom to the Roman Empire. The tombs of the sixth dynasty, some of which are connected family complexes, include significant biographical writings. The inside of the tombs are lavishly adorned with vibrant wall murals depicting daily life scenes, hieroglyphic biographies, and inscriptions detailing the noblemen’s excursions into Africa.
  • Kubbet el-Hawa (on top of the hill above the Tombs of the Nobles). A little shrine Or mausoleum dedicated to the memory of a local sheikh and holy figure. The ascent is rewarded by breathtaking views of Aswan, the Nile, and the surrounding terrain, all of which are vividly represented in the place name’s Arabic translation, “the dome of the wind.”
  • Mausoleum of Mohammed Shah Aga Khan (High up in the west bank). Tomb of the Islami sect’s 48th iman and his wife. Although closed to the public, it is visible from the outside.
  • Monastery of St Simeon. October to May: 8AM-4:00PM; June-September:7:00AM-5:00PM. The monastery of St. Simeon has a lengthy history dating back to the 7th century, and it served as a Christian bastion in southern Egypt until Saladin destroyed it in 1173. It formerly housed 300 monks and could accommodate up to 100 pilgrims at a time while it was still in service. The monastery served as a stronghold and was enclosed by a 10 meter high wall. After Saladin’s devastation, it seems that the monastery was never used again. To reach here, take a camel ride or walk from the Noble Tombs.

Around Aswan

  • The High Dam. Despite its importance as a piece of infrastructure, the Aswan High Dam is (to put it mildly) a disappointment, especially for dam fans.
  • Philae Temple (Agilkia Island). This was the last ancient temple erected in the traditional Egyptian architectural style, dedicated to Isis. The construction started about 690 BC. It was relocated from its original site on Philae Island to Agilkia Island after Lake Nasser’s inundation. Philae and a number of other temples were transferred by a large international UNESCO team and now dot the banks of Lake Nasser. A little distance distant, you can see the submerged original island, accentuated by the steel columns used in the relocation procedure. Don’t miss the Sound and Light performance at night, which is the least corny of the Sound and Light “extravaganzas,” as seen to the right. On your feet, keep an eye out for the incredibly inventive guards who will do anything to get into your photographs or to point out the hieroglyphics that you can quite plainly see for a baksheesh(tip)! Notable is the temple’s conversion to a Christian church, with crosses cut into earlier hieroglyph reliefs and deliberately damaged representations of Egyptian gods. Graffiti going all the way back to the 1800s may be found.
  • Kalabsha Temple. As with Philae, UNESCO relocated this temple and its accompanying remains to protect it from Lake Nasser’s flooding. During the reign of Emperor Augustus, the major temple was dedicated to the Nubian fertility and sun deity Marul. Don’t miss the Kiosk of Qirtasi and Ramesses II’s magnificent Temple of Beit al-Wali.
  • Abu Simbel. The majority of visitors use Aswan as a base to see this magnificent temple. A convoy leaves at 4 a.m. and is often organized by your travel agency. For further information, see the Abu Simbel page.
  • Aswan International Sculpture Park. Each spring, the International Sculpture Symposium brings together sculptors from across the globe to present their work. The pieces are made in Aswan (on the terrace of the Basma Hotel) and then transported to this location to be displayed alongside one another in front of the old quarry.

Museums & Galleries In Aswan

Nubian Museum

This museum chronicles Nubia’s history from its first settlements to the current day. Nubia is defined as the territory bounded between Egypt’s Aswan and Sudan’s Khartoum.

Address: El Fanadeq St. Downtown, Aswan 81111, Egypt

Animalia

Nubia’s information resource center (nature and culture) It is a three-part ethno-biological museum. 1-nubian typical home 2- The museum displays wildlife from Nubia (stuffed animals, reptiles, birds, fish, and insects), as well as rocks and stones. 3-the roof terrace, which serves cocktails, lunch, and short meals. Additionally, lectures about Nubia, the Nile, and elephantine are delivered while overlooking the gardens. Additionally, Animalia organizes nile birding tours led by expert guides MOHAMMED SOBHY and his daughter Fatma.

  • Phone Number: +20 100 300 5672
  • Website : http://www.animalia-eg.com
  • Working Hours: Sun – Sat 6:00 am – 8:00 pm

Food & Restaurants In Aswan

  • Al-Masry Restaurant, Sharia Al Matar. Locals like it. Excellent kebabs and kaftas, as well as pigeon and chicken, all served with bread, salad, and tahini. Dishes ranging from 8LE to 30LE.
  • Aswan Moon, Corniche an Nil (Situated on pontoons along the Nile),   +20 97 231 6108. Appropriate meal served by a cheerful staff. Local fish restaurants near the city market may be wonderful; their fish is fresh, and you can see them prepare it. Don’t forget to get the crab soup! 4LE to 9LE for mezze; 19LE to 25LE for pizza; 25LE for kebob; 13LE for Daoud Basha (meatballs with tomato sauce).
  • Biti Pizza, Midan al Mahatta (Near the train station). Serves fiteer, an Egyptian-style flaky pizza, as well as western-style pizzas. 20LE for pizza.
  • Chef Khalil, Sharia al Souq (Near the train station). Fresh fish restaurant that charges by the pound. A little establishment, but well worth the wait. Between 25LE to 60LE.
  • Emy, Corniche an Nil (On a double deckered boat moored in the Nile, next to Aswan Moon),   +20 97 230 4349. Nubian felucca captains are well-known for their popularity. There is beer available. 9LE for beer; 3LE for salads; 13LE to 18LE for Egyptian and foreign cuisine; 5LE for fresh juices.
  • Madena Restaurant, Sharia al souq (Close to Cleopatra Hotel). Small place.Kofta meal: 22LE; Vegetarian meal: 15LE.
  • Nubian House, off Sharia al Tahrir, 1km past Nubian Museum,   +20 97 232 6226. Sunset views over the first cataract are spectacular. Sheesha and tea are both legal in the United States. Between 15LE to 22LE.
  • Panorama, Corniche an Nil,  +20 97 231 6169. Serves basic Egyptian stews in clay pots accompanied with salad, mezze, and rice. Breakfast is served throughout the day. Dishes ranging from 8LE to 20LE.

Shopping In Aswan

The souqs (markets) of Aswan are delightfully unique, without the high-pressure sales tactics seen in certain tourist destinations farther north. In general, Nubian handicrafts are of greater quality and more affordable in Aswan. All other things will be more costly than in Cairo, owing to the higher shipping expenses to Aswan and the decreased visitor demand.

Aswan’s Souks

Sharia as-Souq

Egypt’s most attractive souq, There is far less push to purchase here than in other places. Purchase Nubian talismans, baskets, Sudanese swords, African masks, live produce, food, fruit, and vegetables, henna powder, t-shirts, perfume, and spices, as well as robes and sculptures.

Aswan Bazaar

The Aswan Bazaar is the destination for all those seeking a one-of-a-kind shopping experience. It is three blocks away from the Nile River. It consists of seven blocks of retail space. The Bazaar is densely packed with vendors selling exquisite wares. From Persian carpets to traditional shisha smoking pipes, this location is a shopper’s heaven. This market sells a variety of souvenirs and presents.

Om Elnor

You cannot leave Aswan without purchasing some genuine jewels. Make your way to Om Elnor to get some unusual items of jewelry. The necklace is inspired by the motifs engraved on the temple walls of Egypt. These are referred to as Cartouches. Om Elmor carries silver and gold jewelry. On Mahmod Betet Street, this jewelry shop is situated.

Spice Market

Aswan is world-renowned for its spices. Egyptian cuisine is bursting with flavor, and the key lies in the spices. In Aswan, there is a market dedicated only to the spice trade. The Spice Market has every possible condiment. From the most costly saffron to unusual lemon grass, the Spice Market has it all. The scent will entice you to this market nestled in the valley of the Nile. Spices such as cumin, fennel, peppermint, and bascilicum will relax your senses with their colors and fragrances.

Hubia Craft Center

Nubian art was formerly regarded as holy in ancient times. With time, this art genre became marginalized. The Hubia Craft Center is an effort to revitalize the art form while also providing work for the genre’s different artists. The Center exhibits and sells many facets of this style of art. Visitors may peruse the handcrafted bronze sculptures and stone carvings. Additionally, this Center sells various old postal stamps.

Nightlife In Aswan

Night Shows

As the sun sets, Aswan comes alive with its fascinating night entertainment, most of which are based on fascinating mythology. You should not miss it if you are a history enthusiast or interested in learning about the local art and culture.

If you prefer to spend your evening surrounded by spectacular lights, head to the stunning Philae temple complex to take part in its Sound and Light Show, which includes dramatic lighting, excellent multimedia presentations, and narration, all of which illuminate the incredible legends of Osiris – the Lord of the Dead – and his much-loved wife, Isis.

Aswan offers a plethora of musical possibilities, with frequent concerts at sites including as Ferial Gardens. If you’re lucky, you could have a chance to see fantastic performances by great Nubian stars like Khitr al-Atar and Hassan Jazuli. Above all, Nubian tahtib, or stick dancing, is an inextricable part of the majority of Aswan’s night entertainment.

Bar and Hotel

The majority of the city’s hotels, pubs, and restaurants provide a variety of ways to spice up your evening by hosting live Nubian performances. Visit The Tower Bar, located inside the Aswan Oberoi Hotel, to sip your favorite drink while taking in views of the city, including the Nile River. Similarly, the New Cataract Hotel’s night club is a great place to go if you wish to dance to the rhythm of western or Nubian music. Stepping inside Isis Hotel, which has a night disco, is also a terrific way to spend your evening and night in a vibrant manner.

Night Cruises

Do you wish to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city? Then there are no better possibilities than spending the night sailing along the Nile’s serene, glittering waters. A three-day, three-night Nile cruise from Aswan to Luxor will allow you to appreciate the grandeur of the region in a unique manner and bring back some unforgettable, beautiful memories.

Festivals & Events In Aswan

Miracle of Sun Festival

This multicultural event attempts to bring people of different religions together. The celebration may be traced back to the Pharaohs’ reign. King Ramses, who is widely considered as the most holy of all Egyptian monarchs, is honored at the event. This event takes place over two nights. The focus is on teaching people about Egypt’s cultural treasures. People gather around Aswan’s ancient landmarks to perform traditional song and dance performances. This event is really one of two that commemorate Ramses’ ascent to the throne of Egypt. The Miracle of the Sun is observed in February, while the other is observed in October. These festivals are also held in Luxor, sections of Cairo, and other villages in the West Bank, although Aswan is the epicenter of the celebrations.

International Symposium of Sculpture

This festival has become one of the most popular cultural events on the continent of North Africa. Every year, it attracts thousands of international tourists. This event has been going on for almost a decade. Its goal is to bring together different perspectives on world history and the sculptural forms that are unique to each country. The events will take place at a local open-air museum.

Stay Safe & Healthy In Aswan

In general, Aswan is a pretty secure city. However, keep an eye out for obvious pickpocketing efforts at the souq. These crooks may approach you with scarves, shirts, or even papyrus in one hand, offering to sell you something while the other hand tries to get into your pockets. The locals are aware of the situation, but don’t expect them to interfere. Women should also avoid traveling alone if they feel uncomfortable with leering guys, despite the fact that they are all bluster. When you get at your location, most horse carriage drivers will not commit to a fee, and you will be required to pay extra.

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