Tuesday, October 26, 2021

Iceland

EuropeIceland

Iceland, or Lveldi sland in Icelandic, is a Nordic island nation located in the North Atlantic Ocean. It has a population of 332,529 people and covers an area of 103,000 km2 (40,000 sq mi), making it Europe’s least populous nation. Reykjavk is the capital and biggest city. Over two-thirds of Iceland’s population lives in Reykjavk and the neighboring regions in the southwest. Iceland is a volcanological and geological hotspot. The inner plateau is characterized by sand and lava fields, mountains, and glaciers, while the lowlands are drained by many glacial rivers. Iceland, despite its high latitude well beyond the Arctic Circle, benefits from the Gulf Stream’s warming effect and enjoys a moderate climate. Summers remain cool due to the island’s high latitude and maritime influence, with the majority of the archipelago having a tundra environment.

According to Landnámabók, Iceland’s colonization started in 874 CE, when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the island’s first permanent resident. Norwegians, and to a lesser degree other Scandinavians, came to Iceland in the following centuries, bringing with them Gaelic thralls. The Althing, one of the world’s oldest operating legislative bodies, ruled the island as an autonomous republic. Iceland acceded to Norwegian authority in the 13th century after a period of civil conflict. It was annexed by Denmark in 1814, during which time a unique Icelandic national identity developed. This culminated in 1918 with independence and the establishment of a republic in 1944. Iceland depended heavily on subsistence fishing and agriculture until the twentieth century, and was one of the poorest countries in Europe. Industrialization of the fishing industry and Marshall Plan assistance after World War II resulted in affluence, and Iceland became one of the world’s richest and most developed countries. It joined the European Economic Area in 1994, diversifying its economy further into areas like as banking, biotechnology, and manufacturing.

Iceland has a market economy with minimal taxes in comparison to the rest of the OECD. It retains a Nordic social welfare system that offers universal health care and access to postsecondary education for its people. [10] Iceland is highly ranked in terms of economic, political, and social stability and equality. In 2013, the United Nations’ Human Development Index rated it as the world’s 13th most developed nation. Iceland is nearly entirely powered by renewable energy. As a result of the continuing global financial crisis, the country’s entire banking system collapsed systemically in October 2008, precipitating a severe slump, widespread political upheaval, the Icesave dispute, and the imposition of capital restrictions. Numerous bankers have been imprisoned, and the economy has recovered significantly, owing in large part to a boom in tourism.

Icelandic culture is based on the country’s Scandinavian ancestors. Icelanders are mostly descended from Germanic and Gaelic immigrants. Icelandic, a North Germanic language, is linked to Faroese and West Norwegian dialects. It is derived from Old Norse. Traditional Icelandic food, Icelandic literature, and medieval sagas are all part of the country’s cultural legacy. Iceland has the lowest population of any NATO member and is the only one without a permanent army, with defense provided by its lightly armed coast guard.

Iceland | Introduction

If you like weird and barren landscapes, Iceland is a breathtakingly gorgeous location to visit. The quantity of daylight changes significantly by season due to its proximity to the Arctic Circle. In June, the sun sets momentarily each night, but it does not become completely dark before rising again....

How To Travel To Iceland

By plane Iceland is readily accessible by air, with Keflavk (IATA: KEF) in the southwest of the country, approximately 40 kilometers from Reykjavk, serving as the major international airport. The airport itself is sparse, so pack books or other kinds of entertainment if you have a long stopover. Iceland is not...

How To Travel Around Iceland

By plane Airplanes, like buses or trains in other countries, are Iceland's primary mode of internal transportation. If you're entering one of the fjords, such as Akureyri, be aware that the trip may be a little rough. Air Iceland, Atlantic Airways, and Eagle Air provide scheduled service to neighboring locations such...

Visa & Passport Requirements for Iceland

Iceland is a signatory to the Schengen Treaty. Between nations that have signed and implemented the pact, there are usually no border restrictions. This covers the majority of the European Union as well as a few additional nations. Before boarding foreign planes or vessels, identification checks are typically performed. At land...

Destinations in Iceland

Regions in Iceland Southwest IcelandThe capital, Reykjavk, and the bulk of the island's inhabitants are located here. West FjordsRugged terrain with hundreds of fjords surrounded by high hills, sparsely inhabited. West IcelandSnfellsjökull glacier, Breiafjörur islands, and more.00 North IcelandStunning lava fields and raging waterfalls. East IcelandMore fjords and the sole international passenger ferry port...

Accommodation & Hotels in Iceland

You won't regret taking an eye mask with you if you come during the heat. There is no real night throughout the summer, and the sun may only drop for a few minutes below the horizon in the north. Reserving a month or more in advance for travel during the...

Things To See in Iceland

The Gullfoss waterfall is awe-inspiring.Geysir, the most famous of all geysers, and Strokkur, which erupts every five minutes or so.Þingvellir National Park, is a magnificent environment of water-cut lava fields that is historically significant as the location of Iceland's parliament, which dates back to 930 AD.Vatnajökull glacier, Europe's biggest,...

Things To Do in Iceland

Blue Lagoon, a geothermal spa, is a popular attraction and pastime. It's conveniently located between the capital and the main airport, making it accessible to the majority of tourists.There are many hiking possibilities in Iceland. If you decide to go off the beaten route, sturdy ankle-supporting walking boots are...

Food & Drinks in Iceland

Food in Iceland As the popularity of various kinds of food has grown, Icelandic cuisine has shifted significantly in recent decades, from mostly featuring lamb or fish in some form or another. Vegetarian diets are more difficult to follow, although there are many vegetarian restaurants in Reykjavik, and vegetarian meals...

Money & Shopping in Iceland

Currency The Icelandic króna (kr or ISK) is the native currency, and its value plummeted during the 2008 financial crisis. It is currently trading at about €1 = 140 kr as of May 2016. This has also made local pricing more accessible to visitors, despite the fact that import prices...

Festivals & Holidays in Iceland

Christmas: Follows the Western church's calendar. On Christmas Eve (December 24), Christmas Day (December 25), New Year's Eve (December 31), and New Year's Day (January 1), stores are typically closed (1 January).Iceland has a total of 13 jule lads. Historically, the jule lads were pranksters who made amends by...

Traditions & Customs in Iceland

Some Icelanders claim to believe in huldufólk, or concealed people, and some even claim to have seen them. They are similar to elves, although they are generally seen as distinct entities. There is even a museum dedicated to the hidden people in Reykjavik. This is an old Icelandic belief...

Internet & Communications in Iceland

Telephone Call 112 from any phone in an emergency. These calls are free, and an emergency services operator will ask you which services you need (police, fire, ambulance, coastguard, rescue teams, civil protection, and child abuse protection), as well as your location. The phone numbers for non-urgent calls vary depending on where...

Language & Phrasebook in Iceland

Icelandic (slenska) is the official language of Iceland, which is extremely close to, but not identical to, 13th-century Norse. Icelandic lettering utilizes the Latin alphabet, but includes two letters that have long since been lost in English: eth (,), which sounds like the voiced th of "they," and thorn(,),...

Culture Of Iceland

The origins of Icelandic culture may be found in North Germanic traditions. Icelandic literature, particularly the sagas and eddas produced throughout the High and Late Middle Ages, is well-known. Centuries of isolation have helped to protect Iceland's Nordic culture from other influences; one notable example is the preservation of...

History Of Iceland

Settlement and Commonwealth 874–1262 Celtic monks known as the Papar, presumably members of a Hiberno-Scottish mission, existed in Iceland before Scandinavian immigrants arrived, according to both Landnámabókand slendingabók. Recent archaeological investigations in Hafniron, on the Reykjanes peninsula, have uncovered the remains of a cabin. It was abandoned between 770 and...

Stay Safe & Healthy in Iceland

Stay Safe in Iceland 112 is the number to call in an emergency. Iceland is one of the safest countries in the world, so you're unlikely to be robbed or harassed. This does not apply to Reykjavik, which has seen an increase in petty theft and nighttime violence. When enjoying the...

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