Monday, January 17, 2022

History of Uruguay

South AmericaUruguayHistory of Uruguay

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Uruguay was discovered in the late 16th century by Spanish Adelantados and was a part of the United Provinces of the River Plate until 1811. (Although plata technically means “silver” in Spanish, the conventional and proper translation is “plate,” since it was formerly used as a synonym for precious metals.) Uruguay was formerly known as the Banda Oriental, or Eastern Band, of colonies along the Uruguay and Plate Rivers’ eastern edges.

The capital was relocated to Montevideo when Buenos Aires ousted the last Viceroy, Baltasar Cisneros. The revolutionary fleet set sail from Buenos Aires, backed by local rebel soldiers, in an effort to defeat the Spanish troops stationed there.

When Montevideo was fully free of Spain, Uruguay planned to separate from Buenos Aires, only to be attacked by the Brazilian Empire, sparking the Argentine-Brazilian war in 1813. The battle eventually came to a halt after a series of perplexing turns. Both warring nations decided to abandon their territorial claims on the Banda Oriental in 1828, thanks to British government intervention, giving birth to the new Eastern Republic of Uruguay. After that, in 1830, a constitution was written and approved. British aid in the formation of Uruguay resulted in a lengthy history of British influence (including the practice of driving on the left), which only came to a stop after World War II.

The Argentinian Civil War, which ravaged the country in the nineteenth century, was not unfamiliar to Uruguay, which soon gave birth to two opposing parties, the Whites (liberals) and the Reds (traditionalists), which eventually led to a Uruguayan Civil War, which raged in various hot and cold phases until the turn of the twentieth century. According to legend, the parties’ colors were inspired by armbands ripped from the Uruguayan flag, but conservatives switched to red armbands after learning that red faded less rapidly in the sun than blue.

However, the simmering conflict between Uruguay’s left and right wing politicians continued. Uruguay attempted an unusual approach taken from Switzerland from 1954 to 1967: a collegiate Executive Office in which a new member was named President each year. Uruguay was dubbed the “Latin American Switzerland” for a while, serving as an example of democracy and financial freedoms until a military coup put a stop to it all.

Uruguay’s president Juan Mara Bordaberry “agreed” to military control of his government in 1973 after a Marxist urban guerrilla organization, the Tupamaros, emerged in the late 1960s. (In 1976, they paid him back by dismissing him and installing the first of many puppet presidents.) The rebels had been brutally crushed by the end of 1974 (and Tupamaro leader and future president Jose Mujica was imprisoned at the bottom of a well), but the military continued to tighten its grip on the government by torturing and disappearing alleged insurgents and anyone perceived to be enemies of the regime. It took until 1985 for civil and democratic government to be restored.

Uruguay’s political and labor circumstances are now among the continent’s most liberal. In 2004, the Tupamaros were part of a Marxist coalition (the Frente Amplio or Broad Front) that won elections and took control of both chambers of congress, the president, and most municipal and regional governments. Mujica, a former guerrilla commander, was elected president in 2009.

How To Travel To Uruguay

By planeCarrasco International Airport, situated 20 kilometers east of Montevideo, is the country's biggest and major hub. Carrasco is a tiny airport, thus most visitors from outside Latin America will need to connect at least one or twice to get there.There are flights from Carrasco to many locations in...

How To Travel Around Uruguay

By trainThere are just a few commuter rail services in and around Montevideo. There are certain tourist trains that do not run on a set timetable. You may locate them by listening for announcements at the Montevideo railway station. There is no consistent long-distance rail service. The bus is...

Visa & Passport Requirements for Uruguay

Passports (or MERCOSUR ID cards) from the following countries do not need a visa to enter: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, South Korea, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Denmark, Ecuador, El Salvador, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Hong Kong,...

Destinations in Uruguay

Regions in UruguayAtlantic Coast (Cabo Polonio, Chuy, La Paloma, Punta del Diablo, Piriapolis, Punta del Este)great beach resorts fronting the Atlantic and a land crossing to Brazil.Rio de la Plata (Montevideo, Colonia)the capital city, old colonial magnificence and a ferry crossing to Argentina.Northern Interior (Salto, Tacuarembo)Gaucho culture, land crossings to Argentina and...

Accommodation & Hotels in Uruguay

There are numerous "estancias" in tranquil and peaceful settings, surrounded by many kinds of native and migratory birds, that provide a unique chance to reconnect with nature for nature enthusiasts, birdwatchers, and those seeking a break from the fast-paced world.Along the shore, there are much more beach homes to...

Things To See in Uruguay

While there are fascinating things to visit across Uruguay, the major tourist attractions are centered around the shore. Unsurprisingly, the capital, Montevideo, has the greatest concentration of things to visit. General Jose Artigas lies in a tomb under an equestrian statue of himself in the center of Plaza Independencia,...

Things To Do in Uruguay

Watching a football game between Nacional and Pearol, the two most watched football clubs in the country, is one of the greatest experiences you can have while in Uruguay.Sunbathing, surfing, and bathing on the Atlantic coast's beaches. Punta del Este, Piriapolis, La Paloma, La Pedrera, Cabo Polonio, Punta del...

Food & Drinks in Uruguay

Food in UruguayUruguayan cuisine is characteristic of temperate nations, with a high butter, fat, and grain content and a low spice content. Because to the large Italian immigrant population, it has a significant Italian impact. If you are from the Mediterranean, you will find it bland, but if you...

Money & Shopping in Uruguay

MoneyThe Peso is Uruguay's currency. Prices are often expressed in U$, which may be mistaken with the US$ (US dollar) sign. The currency rate was about $1 to UYU 30 in January 2016.Prices for more expensive products and services (usually above USD100) are often stated in US dollars rather...

Internet & Communications in Uruguay

TelephoneAntel, the national landline telephone monopoly, is the only supplier of landline Internet service as well as all public pay phones.Although Antel pay phones only accept Antel's proprietary magnetic cards, international calling cards may be used to call home by disconnecting the phone, waiting for a dial tone, then...

Traditions & Customs in Uruguay

Uruguay is a progressive nation on social issues. Uruguay was the first country in the world to provide women the right to vote, 12 years before France. Unlike Argentina, Chile, and Paraguay, Uruguay is a secular state that has not sponsored any religion since 1917. The populace is mostly...

Language & Phrasebook in Uruguay

Spanish is widely spoken across the country. The pronunciation and usage of the vos pronoun instead of t is almost identical to the Spanish variant used in Argentina, commonly known as Rioplatense Spanish. However, it differs significantly from Spanish spoken in Spain in terms of pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary....

Culture Of Uruguay

Uruguayan culture is largely European, with influences from southern Europe being especially significant. The gaucho tradition has played a significant role in both Uruguayan and Argentinan art and culture.Visual artsAbstract painter and sculptor Carlos Páez Vilaró was a well-known Uruguayan artist. He took inspiration from both Timbuktu and Mykonos...

Stay Safe & Healthy in Uruguay

Stay Safe in UruguayIn comparison to its neighbors, Uruguay has always had a relatively low rate of violent crime. As a result, Argentines and Brazilians often vacation in Uruguay because they enjoy not having to worry about getting carjacked, abducted, or killed while on vacation. Uruguay is still largely...

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