Saturday, September 18, 2021

Internet & Communications in Ecuador

South AmericaEcuadorInternet & Communications in Ecuador

Internet

Internet cafés are almost everywhere in the big cities and in many of the smaller towns. The cost is between $1 and $2 per hour in the big cities, and the better places have high-speed access. In some cafés, restaurants and hotels you will find free wifi access, usually protected by passwords; in most cases you just have to ask for the password.

Phone

For most visitors, the easiest place to call is an internet café, most of which offer VOIP service at reasonable prices. You can call the United States for about $0.10 per minute and Europe for a little more. Avoid calling through an operator; the cost of an international call can be $3 or more per minute. For calls within Ecuador, it is possible to use a phone booth. This is a whole shop window filled with telephones. Usually the owner will assign you a booth, you make your call and then pay when you leave. Calls within Ecuador are more expensive than domestic calls in most countries, but not unreasonably so, with the exception of calls to mobile phones, which generate most of their revenue through charges to the caller. In addition, prices for calls within Ecuador increase depending on distance, based on city, province, etc. Visitors planning an extended stay should consider purchasing a mobile phone. Most are sold on a prepaid basis, and top-up cards can be bought in all but the smallest towns. It is also possible to ‘unlock’ a modern GSM mobile phone so that it will work in Ecuador (you can take your own phone if it is compatible with GSM 850MHz), but this should be reserved for emergencies as the cost of such a call is usually exorbitant (about $0.45 per minute).

Radio and television

Radio and/or television is available in Spanish except in some particularly remote areas. English language films are usually shown in the original language with Spanish subtitles. Many hotels have cable TV which may include English language channels and/or premium movie channels with subtitled movies in the original language.

Newspapers and magazines

Spanish-language newspapers and magazines can be bought in the streets of the cities, but are difficult to find elsewhere. Some hotels catering to foreigners may have a small selection of English-language reading material.