Thursday, August 11, 2022

Traditions & Customs in Trinidad and Tobago

North AmericaTrinidad and TobagoTraditions & Customs in Trinidad and Tobago

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It is a good idea to greet a stranger before asking a question. It is best to avoid strangers when you are not in the company of others. Nude or topless bathing is prohibited in Trinidad and Tobago.

Many Trinbagonians like to discuss sports. As it is a former British colony, these discussions usually revolve around cricket and football (football).

Several of the world’s major religions are well represented in Trinidad and Tobago. Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Baha’i are popular. Judaism is not very popular and is mainly practised by expatriates. Atheism and agnosticism are not widespread, although many people have agnostic beliefs without being openly agnostic.

Although Trinidad has a large Indian Hindu community, there are no taboos that Westerners would find difficult to get used to. The cow is not so sacred as to prohibit eating beef or wearing leather, although Hindus do not eat beef (a few ultra-conservative Hindus may take offence, but they are very, very few).

Trinidadians can be extremely friendly and hospitable – especially to guests who share their religion. Don’t forget to bring small gifts as a thank you, as some visitors who had no intention of visiting or staying with the locals end up doing so.

Some houses (including some guest houses) in rural areas are not connected to an underground water system. However, they may have running water from a large, round, black outdoor tank. If you stay in such a place, be sure to conserve water, especially during the dry season (or all year round if the tank does not collect rainwater from the roof). If the tanks run dry, tankers may be available to fill them. But underground running water can also be rationed in the dry season. In short, if you are not staying in a big hotel, find out about the water situation.

How To Travel To Trinidad and Tobago

By air The main airport is Piarco International Airport (IATA: POS) on the island of Trinidad, about 25 km southeast of Port of Spain. Direct flights are available from Miami, Ft. Lauderdale, Houston, Orlando, New York (JFK) and Newark, USA; Toronto, Canada; London, UK; Caracas and Porlomar, Venezuela; Panama City,...

How To Travel Around Trinidad and Tobago

On the islands By taxi Taxis are ordinary passenger cars, without any special marking. However, their number plate starts with the letter "H". They can be found at taxi stands, which can be located on a street corner or at the side of the road. Taxi ranks in cities and districts...

Visa & Passport Requirements for Trinidad and...

All visitors must bring: a valid passport for the duration of the stay, a return ticket, proof of financial means to support themselves, an address in TT, e.g. a hotel or family/friends. Citizens of the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Caricom countries (except Haiti), Singapore and most EEA and Latin...

Destinations in Trinidad and Tobago

Cities Port-of-Spain - CapitalArima - birthplace of the famous calypso artist "Lord Kitchener".Chaguanas - the fastest growing and largest community, populated mainly by descendants of Indentured Labourers from the East Indies.Chaguaramas - a town with one of the most important yachting centres, also famous for its nightlife; home of the...

Weather & Climate in Trinidad and Tobago

Trinidad and Tobago, both well situated in the tropics, enjoy a generally pleasant tropical maritime climate influenced by the northeast trade winds. In Trinidad, the average annual temperature is 26°C (78.8°F) and the average maximum temperature is 34°C (93.2°F). Humidity is high, especially during the rainy season when it...

Accommodation & Hotels in Trinidad and Tobago

There is a wide range of accommodation options. There are the big hotels like the Crowne Plaza, the Hyatt and the Hilton. There are also smaller guesthouses, especially in Tobago, and beach houses on the coasts (especially on the east coast). Prices vary. In Trinidad, there is no official...

Things To See in Trinidad and Tobago

Beaches Popular beaches in Trinidad are Maracas, Tyrico, Las Cuevas, Toco, Mayaro, Chagville, Los Iros and Quinam. Most of the beaches on the north coast are beautiful, with powdery sand and clear blue water. Los Iros and Quinam are fine, but Quinam's water can be brown, largely due to sediment...

Things To Do in Trinidad and Tobago

Pre-Lent Carnival The annual Carnival festival is one of the most famous things in Trinidad and Tobago, with its many beautiful dances and celebrations. Every year on the Sunday, Monday and Tuesday before Ash Wednesday and Lent, thousands of costumed revelers parade through the streets celebrating "The Greatest Show On...

Food & Drinks in Trinidad and Tobago

Food in Trinidad and Tobago Because of its diverse past, Trinidad and Tobago offers excellent and varied food options. The Indian roots in particular have produced some of the best dishes of any country in the world. If you cannot tolerate extremely hot and spicy food, you should tell the...

Money & Shopping in Trinidad and Tobago

Currency The currency is the Trinidad and Tobago Dollar (TTD), also known as "TT" (pronounced teetee). US dollars are also widely accepted and the exchange rate in September 2014 was 1 USD = TTTD6.23. Visa and MasterCards are accepted in many shops. American Express, Diners' Club, Discover, JCB and other cards...

Internet & Communications in Trinidad and Tobago

The international dialling code for Trinidad is 868 under the North American numbering plan. From the United States and Canada, it is the same as for calls to other states and provinces (1+868), but it costs more. Its top-level domain is . tt and its ITU call sign prefixes...

Language & Phrasebook in Trinidad and Tobago

English is the official language. Words are spelled according to the British spelling (e.g. paint, work, tyre, etc.). English-Creole (although not called English-Creole by locals) is very commonly used for informal communication between locals. It is mainly an oral language, rarely written (and then only improvised). A Trinidadian dictionary,...

Culture Of Trinidad and Tobago

Trinidad and Tobago is home to two Nobel Prize-winning authors, V. S. Naipaul and St Lucian-born Derek Walcott (who founded the Trinidad Theatre Workshop and spent much of his career working and raising his family in Trinidad). Designer Peter Minshall is known not only for his Carnival costumes, but...

History Of Trinidad and Tobago

The islands were first settled by the Arawak and Carib peoples who settled there from the South American continent and whose descendants form a small minority of the population. Trinidad was discovered by Christopher Columbus, who claimed it for Spain. Under Spanish rule, many French settlers established cocoa plantations...

Stay Safe & Healthy in Trinidad and...

Stay Safe in Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago is known for its increasingly high murder rate, but this is limited to isolated areas of the country. The capital Port of Spain is relatively safe, but like all major cities in the world, there are deprived areas that are not...

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