Friday, September 10, 2021

Things To Know Before Traveling To Denmark

EuropeDenmarkThings To Know Before Traveling To Denmark

Consular assistance

Almost all industrialized countries have embassies in Copenhagen, while the majority of other countries have embassies in either Stockholm or Copenhagen that are in charge of consular services across the Scandinavian area. EU member countries often maintain consulates in the provinces. There are now 71 foreign embassies and more than 100 consulates in Copenhagen and bigger cities like as Aarhus, Aalborg, Odense, and Vejle. If you suffer severe criminal injuries while in Denmark, you may be entitled to cash compensation. If you want to make a claim, you must report the event to the police within 24 hours and submit a form obtained from the police to Erstatningsnvnet; Gyldenlvesgade 11, 1600 Copenhagen V, Tel +45 33 92 33 34, Fax: +45 39 20 45 05, Email: [email protected] The processing period for a claim is at least three months.

Customer Service

By most measures, the Danes have a lot to learn about customer service, and many tourists may be surprised by the poor standards seen outside upscale businesses that are accustomed to dealing with international demands. Many credit this to the high level of equality that exists not just in reality, but also in the mind – “you are not worth any more than I, therefore why should I treat you any differently?” In general, it’s simply one of those cultural differences you’ll encounter while visiting another nation, and throwing a hissy fit or asking to talk with the supervisor is unlikely to get you anywhere. Tipping, on the other hand, is not anticipated nor needed. When you do encounter excellent service, it is more likely to be real helpfulness than an expectation for tips or staff training courses – so savor such moments, remember to tip, and forget about the rest.

On a practical level, this implies that at restaurants, you should only expect table service. In cafés and bars, you typically order at the bar or counter and pay right away, even if you plan to place a second order. It is also typical for employees who are not serving customers to gladly keep the client waiting until he or she is through with whatever has to be done. Also, don’t anticipate any sirs or madams; most Danes, even those behind the counter, find verbal bromides uncomfortable.

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By most measures, the Danes have a lot to learn about customer service, and many tourists may be surprised by the poor standards seen outside upscale businesses that are accustomed to dealing with international demands. Many credit this to the high level of equality that exists not just in reality, but also in the mind – “you are not worth any more than I, therefore why should I treat you any differently?” In general, it’s simply one of those cultural differences you’ll encounter while visiting another nation, and throwing a hissy fit or asking to talk with the supervisor is unlikely to get you anywhere. Tipping, on the other hand, is not anticipated nor needed. When you do encounter excellent service, it is more likely to be real helpfulness than an expectation for tips or staff training courses – so savor such moments, remember to tip, and forget about the rest.

On a practical level, this implies that at restaurants, you should only expect table service. In cafés and bars, you typically order at the bar or counter and pay right away, even if you plan to place a second order. It is also typical for employees who are not serving customers to gladly keep the client waiting until he or she is through with whatever has to be done. Also, don’t anticipate any sirs or madams; most Danes, even those behind the counter, find verbal bromides uncomfortable.