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Tirana Travel Guide - Travel S Helper

Tirana

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Tirana is Albania’s capital and biggest city. Since 1920, the city has served as Albania’s capital.

The city is home to several state institutions as well as public and private colleges, and it is the focal point of the country’s political, economic, and cultural life.

Tirana is experiencing a dramatic transformation since its communist era. Many of the drab, boring buildings have been repainted, but there is still a lot of work to be done. English is quickly gaining traction as the city’s second language among the young, while many elderly people still speak Italian.

The major commercial and entertainment district has been renamed “The Block,” after the location where communist officials used to dwell under stringent security in the past. Tirana is a young and vibrant city that exudes perpetual vitality. Locals like to congregate at the city’s many cafés and public parks. A popular day trip is via cable car to Mount Dajti, where one may obtain a bird’s-eye perspective of the city.

Tirana – Info Card

POPULATION : 800,986
FOUNDED :  1614
TIME ZONE : CET (UTC+1)     Summer : (UTC+2)
LANGUAGE : Albanian (official ), Greek, Vlach, Romani
RELIGION : Muslim 70%, Albanian Orthodox 20%, Roman Catholic 10%
AREA : 41.8 km2 (16.1 sq mi)
ELEVATION : 110 m (360 ft)
COORDINATES : 41°19′48″N 19°49′12″E
SEX RATIO : Male: 50,11%
 Female: 49,89%
ETHNIC : Albanian 95%, Greek 3%, other 2%
AREA CODE : +355 4
POSTAL CODE : 1000
WEBSITE : Official Website

Tourism in Tirana

Tirana is a lovely and picturesque city with a cosmopolitan and small-town character that is mixed with a vibrant nightlife. Tirana is the meeting point of ancient and modern Albania. Unpaved streets are home to brand new Land Rovers, iPhone-toting kids mingle with street sellers selling a variety of goods, and sparkling glass buildings stare down on abandoned construction projects. Tirana, on the other hand, suffers from environmental issues, mostly as a result of the city’s fast growth in automobile ownership and ongoing development. Long gone are the days when Tirana had virtually daily power outages, which made Tirana a raucous city since the absence of electricity and traffic signals forced automobiles to navigate by blasting their horns.

In terms of power outages, the situation has much improved today. Tirana is experiencing a dramatic transformation since its communist era. Many of the drab, boring buildings have been repainted, but there is still a lot of work to be done. English is quickly gaining traction as the city’s second language among the young, while many elderly people still speak Italian.

The major commercial and entertainment district has become “The Block” (Blloku), which is the region where communist officials used to dwell under rigorous security in the past. Tirana is a young and vibrant city that exudes perpetual vitality. Locals like to congregate at the city’s many cafés and public parks. A popular day trip is via cable car to Mount Dajti, where one may obtain a bird’s-eye perspective of the city.

Albanians are quite welcoming to tourists, despite the media’s unjust portrayal of them as thieves and mobsters. If you’re the daring kind, Tirana is quite accessible – violence is infrequent, if ever aimed at foreigners, and the expenses are relatively inexpensive by regional standards. The worst encounter you may have is with Albanians’ unpredictable driving style.

TOURIST OFFICE

Tourist information office, Rruga Ded Gjo Luli (just north of Skanderbeg Square (behind the National Historic Museum)). open M-F 11.00-16.00 (as of 2013). The English-speaking staff is really helpful and can give maps and instructions to hostels/hotels, among other things. There will also be free copies of the “Tirana in Your Pocket” brochure, which provides important information regarding bus and ferry times.

Climate of Tirana

Tirana’s climate is humid subtropical.

The average temperature ranges from 6.7 degrees Celsius in January to 31 degrees Celsius in July. The average annual rainfall is 1,200 mm. July and August are the driest months, while November and December are the wettest.

Geography of Tirana

Tirana is 110 meters (360 feet) above sea level on average.

The city is primarily surrounded by hills, with Dajti Mountain to the east and a small valley to the north-west that overlooks the Adriatic Sea.

The city features four man-made lakes: Tirana Artificial Lake, around which the Big Park was created, Paskuqani Lake, Farka Lake, Tufina Lake, and various smaller lakes or reservoirs.

Economy of Tirana

Tirana is Albania’s economic hub. It is the country’s main industrial and financial center. It has undergone remarkable expansion since the 1920s, establishing several businesses for agricultural goods and equipment, textiles, medicines, metal products, and services.

Internet, Comunication in Tirana

Internet access in public, commonly provided in an Internet café. Some hotels, particularly those downtown Tirana, offer internet connections in their rooms, and a few have Wi-Fi.

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