Thursday, December 8, 2022
Afghanistan travel guide - Travel S helper

Afghanistan

travel guide

The Afghan culture dates back more than two millennia, at least to the period of the Achaemenid Empire around 500 BC. It is primarily a nomadic and tribal culture, with various areas of the country having their unique customs that represent the nation’s multicultural and multilingual character. Pashtun culture people live in Pashtunwali, an ancient way of life that has persisted to this day, in the southern and eastern area. The remainder of the nation is Persian and Turkish in culture. Pashtunwali was embraced by certain non-Pashtuns living near Pashtuns in a process known as Pashtunization (or Afghanization), while other Pashtuns were persecuted. Millions of Afghans who have lived in Pakistan and Iran over the last 30 years have been affected by the cultures of their neighbors.

Afghans are proud of their culture, country, origins, religion, and independence. They are regarded with worry and contempt, like other climbers, for their high regard for personal dignity, devotion to their tribe, and readiness to resolve conflicts. Because tribal warfare and civic instability have always been one of their primary professions, their individualism has made it difficult for outsiders to subjugate them. Tony Heathcote thinks that the tribal system is the greatest method to manage huge groups of people in a geographically challenging region and in a culture with a materialistic lifestyle. It is believed that there are 60 tribes, mostly Pashtun, and that there are approximately 2-3 million Afghan nomads.

The country has a complicated past that has been preserved in its current cultures or in the shape of many languages and monuments. Many of the historic sites, however, were destroyed during the previous conflicts. The Taliban, who saw idol worshippers as a threat, demolished the two renowned Bamiyan Buddhas. Nonetheless, archaeologists continue to discover Buddhist relics in different areas of the nation, some of which date back to the second century. This suggests that Buddhism was widely practiced in Afghanistan. Herat, Kandahar, Ghazni, Mazar-i-Sharif, and Zarang are other historical cities. Hari Rivervalley’s Jam Minaret is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Cape Protected Area in Kandahar, a city established by Alexander and the first capital of Afghanistan, has a purported cloak worn by the Prophet Muhammad of Islam. The Citadel of Alexander in the western city of Herat has recently been restored and is a famous tourist destination. The shrine of Hazrat Ali, which many think is where Ali was buried, is located in the country’s north. The Afghan Ministry of Information and Culture is restoring 42 ancient sites in Ghazni until 2013, when the province will be designated as the capital of Islamic civilisation. Kabul is home to the National Museum of Afghanistan.

Despite poor literacy, traditional Persian and Pashtun poetry is significant in Afghan culture. Poetry has traditionally been one of the most significant educational foundations of the area, especially at the cultural level. Rumi, Rabi’a Balkhi, Sanai, Jami, Khushal Khan Khattak, Rahman Baba, Khalilullah Khalili, and Parween Pazhwak are among the notable poets.

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Afghanistan - Info Card

Population

40,218,234

Currency

Afghani (AFN)

Time zone

UTC+4:30 Solar Calendar

Area

652,867 km2 (252,073 sq mi)

Calling code

+93

Official language

Pashto - Dari

How To Travel To Afghanistan

By plane

Kabul International Airport (IATA: KBL) in Kabul serves as the country’s primary gateway. By the end of 2008, the old, barely functional, repaired terminal was being utilized for domestic flights, while the new terminal was running in Japan and displaying international flights.

Ariana Afghan Airlines, has a modest fleet of 14 airbuses and Boeings (plus Antonovs). They have daily flights from Dubai and frequent flights from Frankfurt, Islamabad, Delhi, Istanbul, Baku, and Tehran. Ariana is especially poor at scheduling; flights may be canceled or postponed at any time.

A better alternative is the independent operator Kam Air, which operates twice daily flights from Dubai, twice weekly flights from Delhi, and weekly flights from Almaty, Istanbul, and Mashad. If you prefer the country, several flights from Dubai to Kabul stop at Herat. Pamir Airways  is a new private airline that operates daily flights between Kabul and Dubai (USD330 admission, USD210 departure), with occasional stops in Herat. Safi Air also operates flights between Dubai and Kabul. You are the only airline in Afghanistan that has been certified for security. Safi is the only Afghan airline that is permitted to travel to Europe and offers direct flights to Frankfurt. The service is excellent, and the aircraft are sturdy. The personnel is kind and courteous.

Air Arabia used to fly four times a week from Sharjah, however they have since ceased operations. Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) flies to Kabul four times per week from Islamabad and once per week from Peshawar. Another option is to go via Iran, perhaps through Tehran or Mashad. Iran Air travels from Tehran to Kabul on a daily basis. Air India operates six flights each week from Delhi to Kabul. Turkish Airlines began flights between Kabul and Istanbul in 2011.

Flights to other cities, such as Mazar-e Sharif, may be possible if you can connect with the PACTEC charter business. There are just a few seats available.

By car

The well-known Khyber Pass is now restricted to everyone except Afghans and Pakistanis. Some blogs and travel forums say that hiding in a car and bribing border officers works, however this is very dangerous and may result in prison time. The Taliban menace near the pass, on the other hand, is known to murder and abduct Westerners and other foreigners. We highly advise you not to cross the Khyber Pass.

The busiest border crossing between Afghanistan and Pakistan is located inside the Afghan Customs and Border Control Station in Torkham, Nangarhar Province.

There are many routes to Afghanistan:

  • From Peshawar, Pakistan via the Khyber Pass to Jalalabad, in the east.
  • From Quetta, Pakistan to Kandahar, in the south.
  • From Mashad, Iran to Herat, in the west.
  • From Uzbekistan to Mazar-e Sharif, in the north.
  • From Tajikistan to Kunduz, in the northwest.

As of the middle of 2009, none of these routes could be deemed safe.

By bus

Buses operate between Jalalabad and Peshawar, Pakistan, on a regular basis. In addition, between Heart and Mashhad, Iran. Expect delays as the Iranian border police thoroughly inspect the Afghan buses for potential narcotics.

How To Travel Around Afghanistan

By plane

The aircraft travel between Kabul and the capitals on a regular basis (Kandahar, Herat and Mazar-e Sharif). The flights are carried out on a daily basis if the weather permits. The majority of planes depart the city before 11:00 a.m. After sunset, civil aircraft are not permitted to fly.

By car

A developing public transportation network connects the country’s cities. Some routes are served by buses, while Toyota cars have a near-monopoly on transportation in minivans (HiAce) and taxis (Corolla).

Kabul and Mazar-i-Sharif are now linked by a new road. The road is in excellent shape and is deemed “relatively” safe. The trip will take at least 5 hours. The route passes through the renowned Salang Mountains as well as the Hindu Kush Mountains. If you hire a reasonably new Toyota Corolla, an address from Mazar Station in Kabul to any place in Mazar-i-Sharif would cost you about $ 100 (if negotiated by a local).

Much of Afghanistan lacks taximeters. The cabs are bright yellow and easily identified. Before you seat down, you must usually reach an arrangement with the driver. In perfect circumstances, you may see 2 to 3 kilometers of road for USD1 (AFN50).

Jeeps and Land Cruisers may be rented, as well as drivers that know a little English (do not keep your high hopes that you might encounter one of them). There are tour operators in Kabul that can offer a vehicle and a guide; these individuals may be hired from Kabul’s international airport. In the field, gas stations are rare, and gasoline is costly.

Paved roads are the rarity rather than the norm, and even these may be in disrepair. Outside, the capitals await the arrival of dirt roads (which turn to mud in the rain or melted snow). Military convoys and jingle trucks dominate the route between Kabul and Bagram.

WARNING: Keep a safe distance from military convoys. They move at a leisurely pace and are highly armed. Overtaking these cars is not permitted. They perceive too near driving or rapid coming from behind as a hostile activity and OPEN FIRE.

DO NOT TRY TO TAKE PHOTOS OF THESE VEHICLES OR USE YOUR PHONE WHEN THEY ARE NEAR. You may imagine you have an explosive detonator, and you will feel frightened, and they will very certainly start fire on you.

Destinations in Afghanistan

Cities in Afghanistan

  • Kabul – Kabul is the capital of Afghanistan in the east.
  • Bamiyan – The Buddhas’ Remains Once regarded as one of the world’s marvels, the Taliban demolished these stoneworks in an infamous act of cultural vandalism.
  • Ghazni – between Kabul and Kandahar in the southeast
  • Herat – located in the west, it is the entrance to Iran and has a significant Persian influence as well as many important historical monuments.
  • Jalalabad – Jalalabad is located in eastern Afghanistan, between Kabul and the Khyber Pass.
  • Kandahar – Kandahar, a southern city affected by the Taliban, is now unsafe.
  • Kunduz – Kunduz is a significant city in the northeast and a border crossing point with Tajikistan.
  • Mazar-e Sharif – Mazar-e Sharif Is home to the magnificent Blue Mosque and a popular starting point for journeys to Uzbekistan.

Other destinations in Afghanistan

  • Balkh: Balkh was formerly one of the region’s biggest cities and the capital of ancient Bactria. Although most of it is in ruins, the surviving architectural and cultural features have remained largely unchanged since the reign of Alexander the Great.
  • Band-e Amir National Park: 5 stunning blue lakes in a remote and picturesque location near Bamiyan.
  • The Khyber Pass, a historic path of conquest and commerce, serves as the entrance to India.
  • The Minaret of Jam is off the main route, but some believe it’s worth the trek – feasible as a roundtrip from Herat or while traveling the Central Route from Herat to Kabul.
  • Panjshir Valley is a lovely hiking region that leads to the renowned Anjuman Pass.
  • The Salang Pass is a steep mountain pass that also serves as a tunnel linking Kabul to the north.
  • Shamali Plain, north of Kabul. Shamali, which meaning “wind” or “north,” is a lush plain that provides a significant quantity of food for central Afghanistan. It runs north from Kabul to Jabal os Saraj, passing via Charikar in the province of Parwan. The Taliban have devastated irrigation systems, which are just now starting to recover.
  • Gardez is a lovely city located in a mountain valley southeast of Kabul.

Things To See in Afghanistan

While the ongoing conflict has almost entirely halted tourism in Afghanistan, the lack of tourists has nothing to do with the country’s viewpoint. This is a region of magical attractions that recounts ancient tales and provides magnificent Islamic architecture, medieval neighborhoods, and surprisingly lovely nature.

Several locations are UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Of course, the most renowned were the ancient Buddhist Bamiyan statues. In a cultural crime that horrified the whole world, the Taliban destroyed the majority of the 6th century sculptures. What remains now in the Bamiyan valley is the quiet and dignified image of the empty niches. The surviving parts of the world’s once biggest sculptures of their type continue to provide interesting insight into the history of this location. The Band-e Amir National Park, with its six linked lakes, is probably the most stunning natural destination. At an elevation of 2900 meters, the blue water in this protected natural region looks almost surreal on the slopes of the sandhills that surround it.

Excellent mosques may be found across the country, with especially big examples in Mazar-i-Sharif and Herat, which is quickly expanding. The Jam Minaret, north of Herat, is on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Food & Drinks in Afghanistan

Afghan bread is classified into three types:

  • Naan – Naan is a Hindi word that means “bread.” It is thin, long, and round, with a white and wholegrain base. Serve garnished with poppy seeds, sesame seeds, Nigella seeds, or a mix of the three. Customers may request white flour and a little amount of oil, which makes them rich and tasty.
  • Obi Non – Bread made in Uzbekistan. Disc-shaped and thicker than naan. White flour is often used.
  • Lavash – Lavash is a thin bread. In other areas, it is similar to the Lavash. It is often used to cover meats and stews.

In Afghanistan, rice dishes are the “monarch” of all meals. The Afghans have definitely put in a lot of time and effort to make their rice, since it is regarded as the finest portion of any meal. Every day, the wealthiest households consume a dish of rice. As shown by the vast number of rice recipes in their cookbooks, the Afghan royal family spent a lot of time cooking and creating rice. Weddings and family reunions should include a variety of rice dishes, and there is no question that one may create a reputation for oneself in the area of rice cooking.

  • Kabuli Pulao (also known as Kabuli Palaw, Qabili Palaw, Qabili Palau, or just Palau) – A dish of Afghan rice made out of stewed rice, lentils, raisins, carrots, and lamb. Bake for 30 minutes, then top with roasted sliced carrots and raisins. You may also use chopped nuts such as pistachios or almonds. The meat is either smothered with rice or buried in the center of the dish. It is Afghanistan’s most popular meal and is considered a national dish.
  • Chalao– White rice- Extra long grains, such as basmati, are required. It was cooked first, then drained, and then baked in an oven with a little oil, butter, and salt. Unlike Chinese or Japanese rice, this technique yields spongy rice with every single grain. Chalao is traditionally served with Qormas (korma; stews or casseroles)
  • Palao – Cooked in the same manner as chalao, but before baking, combine meat and broth, Qorma, herbs, or a mixture. This produces complex hues, tastes, and scents, which give certain charms their names. Caramelized sugar is also used to give rice a dark brown hue.
  • Yakhni Palao – Meat and stock have been added. Produces brown rice.
  • Zamarod Palao – Spinach qorma was added in before baking, thus the name ‘zamarod’ or emerald.
  • Qorma Palao – Before baking, add in Qorm’eh Albokhara wa Dalnakhod.
  • Bore Palao – Qorm’eh Lawand has been added. Produces yellow rice.
  • Bonjan-e-Roomi Palao – Qorm’eh Bonjan-e-Roomi (tomato qorma) inserted during baking. Produces crimson rice.
  • Serkah Palao – This dish is similar to yakhni palao, except it has vinegar and other spices.
  • Shebet Palao – Fresh dill and raisins were added throughout the baking process.
  • Narenj Palao – A sweet and elaborate rice dish made with saffron, orange peel, pistachios, almonds and chicken.
  • Maash Palao – A palao containing mung beans, apricots, and bulgur that is sweet and sour (a kind of wheat). Vegetarian diet alone.
  • Alou Balou Palao – Sweet rice dish with chicken and cherries.
  • Sticky Rices – Boiled medium grain rice prepared with its meat, seasonings, and grains. Because the water does not drain, a sticky rice structure develops. Mastawa, Kecheri Qoroot, and Shola are some of the most notable dishes. When white rice is cooked to a sticky texture, it is referred to as a dressing gown, and it is often served with a Qorma like as sabzi (spinach) or shalgham (beets). Shir Birenj (literally rice milk) is a rice dish that is often served as a dessert.

Qorma is a kind of stew or dish that is often eaten with chawol. The majority of Qormas are onion-based. According to the recipe, the onions are cooked, and then meat, as well as a variety of fruits, spices, and vegetables, are added. Finally, add water and simmer over low heat. The onion caramelizes, resulting in a vibrantly colored stew. There are over 100 Qorms.

  • Qorma Alou-Bokhara wa Dalnakhod – onion based, with sour plums, lentils, and cardamom. Veal or chicken.
  • Qorma Nadroo – onion based, with yogurt, lotus roots, cilantro, and coriander. Lamb or veal.
  • Qorma Lawand – onion based, with yogurt, turmeric, and cilantro. Chicken, lamb, or beef.
  • Qorma Sabzi – sauteed spinach and other greens. Lamb
  • Qorma Shalgham – onion based, with turnips, sugar; sweet and sour taste. Lamb.

In Afghanistan, pasta is known as “Khameerbob” and is often served in the shape of meatballs. These regional foods are very popular. Because the process of making the dough for meatballs takes a long time, it is seldom offered at big gatherings such as weddings, but it is served on special occasions at home:

  • Mantu – Meatballs of Uzbek origin filled with onions and minced beef. Mantu is often steamed and topped with a tomato-based sauce and a yoghurt or Qoroot sauce. Typically, the yoghurt filling is a combination of yoghurt, sour cream, and garlic. The sauce is created with goat cheese and garlic and is based on beets. A combination of Qoroot and yoghurt is sometimes used. Dry mint has been sprinkled on top of the meal.
  • Ashak – Dish from Kabul Dumplings stuffed with leeks Cooked, then drained Ashak is topped with garlic and mint root, or a yoghurt sauce with garlic and a well-seasoned minced beef combination.
  • Afghan kebab is often available in restaurants and at outdoor vendor booths. They are sometimes placed in shishas. Families seldom offer home-made kebabs at home because to the requirement for inaccessible equipment. Lamb is the most frequent meat. The ingredients vary per restaurant, but the Afghan kebab is often marinated in a spice combination and eaten with naan, rather than rice. Customers may add Sumak, also known as Ghora in the region, to their kebab. The quality of the kebab is solely determined by the quality of the meat. To enhance taste, fat chunks from the sheep’s tail (jijeq) are usually added to the lamb skewers. Lamb cutlets, ribs, kofta (minced meat), and chicken are other popular kebabs; everyone is at better places.
  • Chapli kebab, an eastern Afghan speciality, is a fried hamburger. The traditional chapli kebab recipe calls for a half-meat (or less) half-flour combination, which makes it lighter in flavor and less costly.
  • Bolani is prepared in the same manner as Mexican Quesadilla.

Money & Shopping in Afghanistan

Afghanistan’s currency is, of course, the Afghanis (AFN). As of December 2009, one US dollar equaled about AFN48.50, whereas one dollar equaled AFN70.

Haggling is part of the tradition.

Carpets are the most well-known product in Afghanistan. There are “afghan” carpets, but there are also at least two additional carpet weaving traditions. The Baluch tribes in the south and west, as well as the Turkmens in the north, make excellent carpets; both groups are also found in adjacent nations. The three kinds of designs often use geometric patterns, using red as the backdrop color and repeating components known as “guls” to form the design. Generally, they are not as beautifully woven as carpets from nearby towns in Iran. Many of them, however, are quite lovely, and their costs (assuming successful bargaining) are much cheaper than those of the finest Iranian carpets.

  • Baluchi carpets are typically modest in size since nomads cannot utilize big looms; sizes up to 1.5 by 2 meters are popular, but there are few above that. They are popular among tourists because of their portability. A prayer mat large enough for a person to kneel in front of Mecca is a popular kind. Another is the “Nomad’s Commode,” a bag that doubles as a saddlebag while traveling and hangs on the tent wall when camping.
  • Turkoman carpets, often known as “Bokhara” in the Western carpet trade, come in a variety of sizes and quality. Some are weaved by nomads and come in the same sizes and varieties as baluchi rugs. Others are produced in city workshops; the finest are nearly as beautifully woven and almost as costly as high-quality Persian carpets. The Hatchli, a cross form on a big rug, is a popular pattern.
  • Afghan carpets are often made at municipal workshops for export. They are often tall; 3 by 4 meters (10 x 12 feet) is typical. Most are thick enough to save money, while others are very thin. It’s definitely your best option if you need a big carpet for the living room at a low cost.
  • A few decades ago, “Golden Afghan” carpets were very popular in Western nations; they were created by Western distributors who dyed the Afghan carpets white to remove the red hue and left a blue or black pattern over orange or gold. In Afghanistan, where traditional colors are favored, they are uncommon. In the West, collectors prefer classic hues, and bleached carpets are often less expensive. Furthermore, “golden” carpets cannot be utilized as effectively as unbleached carpets since bleaching may harm the fibers. They should be avoided in most instances.

Small abnormalities are prevalent in nomadic woven rugs, such as numerous Baluchi carpets and several Turkmen. Because the loom is disassembled for transportation and rebuilt in the new warehouse, the carpet may not be precisely rectangular. Vegetable dyes, which may vary from lot to lot, are often employed, resulting in color variance (Arbrasch) that can be worsened as the carpet degrades. Most of these anomalies come under the category of “this is not a mistake, it is a feature” for collectors; they are anticipated and accepted. In fact, a good blast may substantially enhance a carpet’s worth.

Turkmen patterns are often imitated; it is usual to find “Bokhara” carpets from India or Pakistan, China makes some, and Afghan carpet designs show a significant Turkmen influence. Original Turkoman carpets, on the other hand, are considerably more valuable to collectors. In Western nations, good baluchi carpets are also extremely valued. Afghan carpets and low quality Baluchi and Turkoman carpets are not treasures; most visitors find the greatest shopping here. Experts may pay greater rates for first-rate carpets, but novices who attempt to do so face significant difficulty.

Kilims are hairless, flat textiles. These are not quite as durable as carpets and will not last as long on the floor as a decent carpet. However, some are very lovely and, in general, less expensive than carpets. Handbags constructed of carpets or embroidered with kilim fabric are very popular.

The Afghan lambskin coat is another famous product and memento. Wool is used on the inside for warmth, while leather is used on the exterior to keep wind, rain, and snow out. They often have lovely needlework. However, there are two measures to take. One example is that manufacturers employ embroidery to conceal leather flaws; high-quality jackets have little or no embroidery. The other is that it is well known that Australian customs officials burn these jackets upon arrival in order to protect their huge sheep population from illnesses (particularly anthrax) that might be transmitted by poorly tanned Afghan goods.

There are also various metalworks, such as pots, vases, and highly adorned plates, as well as some really beautiful knives.

Weapons are extremely prevalent in Afghanistan, and some of them are particularly interesting to historians and collectors.

  • The traditional Afghan Jezail is a long-handled cargo gun that is often ornately adorned in brass or mother of pearl. When doing one of these, use caution. The actual ones are very old, perhaps due to metal fatigue or other issues. Many of the available Jezails are not authentic, but rather replicas manufactured lately for tourism; they were never intended to be shot and are more likely to kill the shooter than strike the target.
  • There are also previous Khyber Pass guns. The most popular are reproductions of the single-lever Martini-Henry rifle used by the British Army in the nineteenth century. Some are.451 caliber, like the original Martini-Henry, but others use a more contemporary round. The number 303 is very frequent. Until the late 1970s Russian invasion, when everyone who could kill a Russian, seize an armory, or pay the price (nearly every Afghan) got an AK-47, it was the most commonly used rifle in Afghanistan. There are also replicas of different weapons, ranging from Webley revolvers to AK-47s. The quality is often questioned, particularly the steel, and shooting one of these guns is dangerous. Passport ammo often had less dust or dust of poorer quality than regular ammunition; some used guns exploded when subjected to the maximum voltage of standard ammunition.

These are a particularly vexing memory. Importing a weapon may be difficult, if not impossible, in certain locations. It’s probably not worth it to go by land and traverse many countries before returning home. There’s a chance that if you fire an Afghan weapon, it’ll explode in your face.

Language & Phrasebook in Afghanistan

Afghanistan’s official languages are Pashto and Dari, an Afghan variant of Persian; many Afghans speak both. According to the most recent CIA country profile, Dari is spoken by 50% of the population, particularly in Kabul, Herat, Mazar-e Sharif, and Central Afghanistan. Pashto is spoken by 35% of the population, mostly in the south and east, and it is also spoken in neighboring Pakistan. The remainder are Turkic languages, mostly Uzbek and Turkmen, with 30 minor languages like as Balochi. There are some individuals in Kabul who speak a little English, although it is not widely spoken.

In Afghanistan, the English language has reached its pinnacle. The proportion of people who can communicate in English has reached previously unheard-of levels. President Karazai and his cabinet speak English well. Previously, English was taught in the seventh grade, but it is currently taught in the fourth grade. English street signs are becoming more prevalent throughout the nation. English is Afghanistan’s second foreign language.

Internet & Communications in Afghanistan

Fixed line service (digital in Kabul) and cell phones are available in most cities. SIM cards and international calls to Europe / EE. UU. are available. They usually cost less than 0.5 USD each minute. Outside of major cities, your only choice is a satellite phone.

An Afghanistan phone number should be in the format +93 30 539-0605, where “93” is the country code for Afghanistan, the following two digits are the area code, and the last seven numbers are the “local” portion of the nation. Subscriber who can be reached via speed dial from inside this area code. Outside of this area code, you must call “0” before the geographic area code (20, 30, 40, 50, or 60 for landlines) (but still within Afghanistan).

No matter where they originate from, mobile numbers in Afghanistan should always be marked with all digits (10 digits, including a “0” in front of the “70n” in Afghanistan). The 70n is a mobile prefix, not a “prefix” in the traditional sense, and the third number (the n portion) denotes the original allocated mobile network. +93 700-202-496 is an example of a cellphone number.

Culture Of Afghanistan

The Afghan culture dates back more than two millennia, at least to the period of the Achaemenid Empire around 500 BC. It is primarily a nomadic and tribal culture, with various areas of the country having their unique customs that represent the nation’s multicultural and multilingual character. Pashtun culture people live in Pashtunwali, an ancient way of life that has persisted to this day, in the southern and eastern area. The remainder of the nation is Persian and Turkish in culture. Pashtunwali was embraced by certain non-Pashtuns living near Pashtuns in a process known as Pashtunization (or Afghanization), while other Pashtuns were persecuted. Millions of Afghans who have lived in Pakistan and Iran over the last 30 years have been affected by the cultures of their neighbors.

Afghans are proud of their culture, country, origins, religion, and independence. They are regarded with worry and contempt, like other climbers, for their high regard for personal dignity, devotion to their tribe, and readiness to resolve conflicts. Because tribal warfare and civic instability have always been one of their primary professions, their individualism has made it difficult for outsiders to subjugate them. Tony Heathcote thinks that the tribal system is the greatest method to manage huge groups of people in a geographically challenging region and in a culture with a materialistic lifestyle. It is believed that there are 60 tribes, mostly Pashtun, and that there are approximately 2-3 million Afghan nomads.

The country has a complicated past that has been preserved in its current cultures or in the shape of many languages and monuments. Many of the historic sites, however, were destroyed during the previous conflicts. The Taliban, who saw idol worshippers as a threat, demolished the two renowned Bamiyan Buddhas. Nonetheless, archaeologists continue to discover Buddhist relics in different areas of the nation, some of which date back to the second century. This suggests that Buddhism was widely practiced in Afghanistan. Herat, Kandahar, Ghazni, Mazar-i-Sharif, and Zarang are other historical cities. Hari Rivervalley’s Jam Minaret is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Cape Protected Area in Kandahar, a city established by Alexander and the first capital of Afghanistan, has a purported cloak worn by the Prophet Muhammad of Islam. The Citadel of Alexander in the western city of Herat has recently been restored and is a famous tourist destination. The shrine of Hazrat Ali, which many think is where Ali was buried, is located in the country’s north. The Afghan Ministry of Information and Culture is restoring 42 ancient sites in Ghazni until 2013, when the province will be designated as the capital of Islamic civilisation. Kabul is home to the National Museum of Afghanistan.

Despite poor literacy, traditional Persian and Pashtun poetry is significant in Afghan culture. Poetry has traditionally been one of the most significant educational foundations of the area, especially at the cultural level. Rumi, Rabi’a Balkhi, Sanai, Jami, Khushal Khan Khattak, Rahman Baba, Khalilullah Khalili, and Parween Pazhwak are among the notable poets.

Stay Safe & Healthy in Afghanistan

Stay Safe in Afghanistan

No area of Afghanistan can be regarded immune to violence, and there is always the possibility of direct or random hostility anywhere in the nation at any moment. The remnants of the previous Taliban government and the Al Qaeda terrorist network, as well as other organizations hostile to the International Security Assistance Force’s (ISAF) military operations, are still active. The Afghan government can only maintain order and guarantee the safety of Afghan people and international tourists to a limited extent. Military conflict, land mines, robbers, violent rivalries between political and ethnic groups, and the potential of insurgent assaults, particularly attacks on cars or other improvised explosive devices, make travel in Afghanistan in all regions dangerous (IEDs). The security situation in the nation is turbulent and unpredictable, with certain regions seeing high levels of violence, particularly in the southeast.

Afghanistan’s southern and eastern regions are turbulent and plain hazardous. The non-essential trip is highly advised against. Banditry is a long-standing practice in several regions of the nation, including the far north. The Taliban militants have stated that kidnapping foreigners is one of their primary objectives. 23 Koreans were kidnapped from a public bus in Ghazni province, south of Kabul, in July 2007. Two of them were murdered, and the others were freed a few weeks later after contentious talks with the Korean government.

The northern portion of the nation is regarded safer than the south and east; nevertheless, events can occur on occasion, and a seemingly safe area may quickly become dangerous. Several German journalists were murdered in northern Afghanistan, most likely by criminals or anti-Westerners. In August 2010, ten physicians (eight foreigners and two interpreters) were assassinated.

Landmines and other UXOs (failures) are still a concern across the nation, so stick to well-trodden routes, avoid red-and-white stones, and don’t touch or move suspicious-looking items. According to the Afghan Red Crescent, landmine and UXO incidents hurt or kill 600 to 700 people each year. This is a significant decrease from over 1,600 in 2002. While going across Afghanistan, you will most likely come across demining groups at work.

You should also keep an eye out for insects and snakes, since the hilly terrain is home to numerous dangerous animals such as scorpions, spiders, centipedes, wasps, and so on.

Altitude danger is a major concern in certain locations.

Homosexual acts among consenting adults are prohibited under Afghan law by a slew of harsh penalties, including death. LGBT tourists should exercise extreme caution.

If, after considering the dangers, you decide to go to Afghanistan, you may minimize your risk by hiring an armed escort or traveling with an experienced tour guide. You should also call your embassy and understand what you can and cannot do in an emergency.

Stay Healthy in Afghanistan

Afghanistan has a number of health issues, so it’s a good idea to talk to a travel doctor about vaccinations and health hazards before going. In many areas of the nation, respiratory illnesses such as TB and foodborne infections are prevalent, and malaria is a threat.

Afghanistan is one of the world’s most twisted nations, and you should expect to absorb and breathe it throughout the majority of your stay, even in the major cities. Diesel engine dirt may make things difficult as well.

Flies are famously unpleasant, owing to a lack of hygienic services. Winter provides respite, but come April, they are restored to their full capacity.

Food should be scrutinized with a cautious eye since sanitary regulations are often broken. Food that is hot and freshly cooked is generally safer. Unless you have your own cleaning system, bottled water is also suggested.

Bring any prescription medications from home and don’t expect to be able to get them on the spot. Because analgesics and antidiarrheal medicines are difficult to come by outside of major cities, you may want to consider using them.

Squats are the norm, as they are in much of Asia, with toilet paper being optional and occasionally limited. Western bathrooms may be found in new buildings and certain individual residences.

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