Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Visa & Passport Requirements for Tunisia

AfricaTunisiaVisa & Passport Requirements for Tunisia

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Algeria, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Austria, Bahrain, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Bermuda, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, British Virgin Islands, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Chile, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Denmark nationals of Dominica, the Falkland Islands, Fiji, Finland, France, Gambia, Germany and Gibraltar. Greece, Guinea, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kiribati, South Korea, Kuwait, Libya, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malaysia, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Monaco, Montenegro,. Montserrat, Morocco, Netherlands, Niger, Norway, Oman, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Trinidad, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Singapore, Slovenia, Solomon Islands,. Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom, the United States and the Vatican City State do not require a visa for entry or stay of up to three months.

Citizens of Canada do not need a visa to enter the country and stay for up to 4 months.

A landing visa (on arrival) is available for Australians.

For nationals of New Zealand, other African and Asian countries, a visa must be applied for at the relevant embassy.

How To Get in Tunisia

With plane The main international airport for regular flights to Tunisia is the International Airport Tunis-Carthage (IATA: TUN), which is located close to Tunis. From the airport, you can take a taxi to the centre of Tunis (be careful, the taxi meters may be tampered with). They are best stopped...

How To Travel Around Tunisia

With plane TunisAir express is the domestic airline branched off from TunisAir. There are flights between Tunis and Tozeur, Djerba and Gabès, and also those to Malta and Naples. The website is only available in French. Booking is possible online or through the Tunisair Express agencies. With car Tunisian highways are similar...

Destinations in Tunisia

Regions Northern Tunisia (Ariana, Bèja, Ben Arous, Bizerte, Jendouba, Mahdia, Manouba, Monastir, Nabeul, Siliana, Sousse, Tunis and Zaghouan) The capital Tunis, the entire northern coast and the mountains, as well as a number of very popular seaside resorts on the Mediterranean Sea.Central Coast Tunisia (Gabès, Madanine, Sfax and Sidi Bouzid)The...

Accommodation & Hotels in Tunisia

There are many good hotels in Tunisia. In the bigger cities there are many smaller hotels hidden in most of the streets. You can also rent a furnished flat. Some private people offer their own flats for rent, especially in summer. It is advisable to organise your accommodation online or by...

Weather & Climate in Tunisia

Tunisia has a Mediterranean climate in the north, with mild rainy winters and hot, dry summers. The south of the country is desert. The relief in the north is mountainous, which, moving southwards, gives way to the hot, dry central plain. Along a line stretching east-west along the northern...

Things To See in Tunisia

History and archaeology Although Tunisia is now mostly known for its beach holidays, the country has an amazing heritage with some extraordinary archaeological remains to explore. Little remains of Carthage, but what is there is relatively well preserved compared to the rest of the ruins in Tunisia. This great city from...

Things To Do in Tunisia

Beaches Beach holidays in Tunisia are very popular, especially with Europeans. Some of the most important beach resorts are along the east coast, from La Goulette (near Tunis) to Monastir.The southern island of Djerba is an alternative. Many water sports activities are widely available or you can just relax and...

Food & Drinks in Tunisia

Food in Tunisia Tunisian cuisine is similar to Middle Eastern cuisine and is based on the traditions of the North African Maghreb, with couscous and marka stew (similar to Moroccan tagines) forming the backbone of most dishes. Unlike the Moroccan dish of the same name, the Tunisian tagine is an...

Money & Shopping in Tunisia

The national currency is the Tunisian dinar(TND). Typical banknotes are circulated in TND5 (green), TND10 (blue or brown), TND20 (purple-red), TND30 (orange) and TND50 (green and purple). The 2 nars are divided into 1000 milleme and the typical coins are TND5 (silver with copper insert), 1 nar (large - silver), 500...

Festivals & Events in Tunisia

1 January: New Year14 January: Revolution and Youth Day4 February: Mouled (anniversary of the Prophet) - (shifts by 11 days per year towards the beginning of the year, depending on the lunar calendar)20 March: Independence Day9 April: Martyrs' Day1 May: Labour Day18 July (2015) : Eid al-Fitr (end of...

Internet & Communications in Tunisia

Phone in Tunisia All towns and most villages have public telephones under the name of Publitel or Taxiphone. International calls are usually quite expensive (DT 1,000/minute for calls within the EU).t There are three GSM mobile operators, the private Tunisiana , the private Orange and the state-owned Tunisie Telecom...

Traditions & Customs in Tunisia

Tunisia is a Muslim country and dress code is important, especially for women. While a lot of skin (even topless) is tolerated on the beaches and in hotel complexes, a modest amount of exposed skin may be frowned upon outside these areas. Be aware that Tunisia becomes more conservative the...

Language & Phrasebook in Tunisia

The official language of Tunisia is Arabic, which is also one of the languages of commerce, the other being French, a heritage of Tunisia as a French protectorate until 1956.The dialect of Arabic spoken in Tunisia, similar to neighbouring Algeria and Morocco, is Maghreb Arabic, which is almost incomprehensible...

Culture Of Tunisia

Culture Of Tunisia is mixed, having been shaped by external influences for a long time: Phoenicians, Romans, Vandals, Byzantines, Arabs, Turks, Italians, Spaniards and French - they have all left their mark on the country. Painting in Tunisia The emergence of contemporary Tunisian painting is closely linked to the School of...

History Of Tunisia

Ancient Farming methods reached the Nile Valley from the Fertile Crescent region around 5000 BC and spread to the Maghreb by around 4000 BC. The farming communities of the humid coastal plains of Central Tunisia represent the ancestors of the present-day Berber tribes. In ancient times, it is believed that Africa...

Stay Safe & Healthy in Tunisia

Stay safe in Tunisia Violence Tunisia has recently experienced a revolution and is currently in a controversial transition phase. Although there is currently no large-scale violence, demonstrations do occur from time to time and are sometimes violent and/or brutally dispersed. Therefore, before travelling to Tunisia, check with your foreign office about...

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