Tuesday, January 18, 2022

Food & Restaurants In Cairo

EgyptCairoFood & Restaurants In Cairo

Read next

Cairo offers a large number of restaurants that appeal to a wide range of tastes. Ironically, any eateries featured in popular guidebooks should be avoided. After getting listed, Egyptian eateries have a propensity of creating a unique English menu with exorbitant rates. However, affordable food may be obtained at street restaurants and snack shops all across the city. Top-tier restaurants are often, but not usually, found in hotels and on Nile cruises. In Egypt’s capital, the distinction between restaurants and cafés is not always evident. It is completely okay to merely have a drink or sheesha in many settings. There may be a minimum fee for medium and high-range outlets. In most cases, less priced restaurants will not provide alcohol as well as more expensive establishments.

In general, downtown is ideal for budget eating, whereas Zamalek, Mohandiseen, or any of the other more wealthy areas of town are better for higher quality dining.

Egyptian and middle eastern food

Traditional Egyptian staples may be found practically everywhere. Traditional dishes such as fl (bean paste), falfel, moussaka, koshari (rice, macaroni, lentils, chick peas, and tomato sauce), feTr (pancakes with various fillings), and shawarma (an import from Lebanon and Syria — pieces of roasted meat usually wrapped in bread) can be found in stalls and street restaurants. Cheaper restaurants will simply offer veggies and sometimes meat hot dogs or corned beef. Eggs, fried potatoes, and salads are generally provided as well. Hygiene varies greatly, and the best suggestion is to stick to the most popular destinations. Avoid eating in deserted restaurants because the food will be less fresh. There are several fine koshari stores, especially downtown, including many locations of the renowned Koshari Tahrir franchise. Delicious and inexpensive fl, falfel, and shawarma sandwiches may be purchased at the numerous Gad fast food establishments strewn across Cairo. A tub of takeout koshari costs around 3 to 5 Egyptian pounds, fl or falfel sandwiches cost about 1 to 1.5 Egyptian pounds, and shawarma sandwiches cost about 4 to 8 Egyptian pounds.

Traditional Egyptian meals will be more restricted in the middle and above price ranges. Despite improvements, traditional Egyptian gastronomical experiences are still primarily limited to private houses. Quality chain restaurants such as Felfela (many locations), Abou El Sid (Zamalek, Maadi, and Dokki), and Abou Shakra provide traditional Egyptian cuisine.

Otherwise, oriental or Middle Eastern restaurants try to combine styles or go entirely for more Lebanese-style dining, which is regarded more fashionable by wealthy Egyptians. The good news is that Cairo has a plethora of high-quality Lebanese enterprises, ranging from Dar Al-Qamar to chic restaurant establishments. There is also Turkish cuisine and eateries catering to Gulf guests.

Western and Asian food

Cairo is home to an increasing number of Western fast food restaurants, which are also some of the greatest locations to observe young Egyptians relaxing together, since fast food restaurants are allegedly rated among the hippest spots to hang out. McDonald’s, Hardee’s, Pizza Hut, and KFC are available throughout the city, however they are more costly. The majority of them also provide free wireless internet access.

Table 11 in Tahrir Square Tahrir Square is located near to KFC. Meals range from locally inspired to international and are owned by a Swedish woman. On the second story, there is a view of Tahrir Square. Beer and wine are available.

Cook, mo’men chain The Egyptian version of McDonald’s, Door, offers a similar menu at comparable costs, as well as free wifi internet.

Lighter fare such as sandwiches and salads, as well as pastries, are available at western-style bakeries and cafés. Popular franchises like as Cilantro, Beanos, Costa, and The Marriott Bakery, as well as individual locations, all provide meals that are comparable in certain ways. The majority of these establishments also provide free wireless internet access.

There’s also a charming TGI Friday’s on the Nile banks near Maadi that serves beer but no wine. Gezira also has its own Chili’s restaurant. For burgers, try Fuddrucker’s [www.fuddruckers.com/] (Maadi and Mohandesseen) or Lucille’s (54 Road n° 9) in Ma’adi, which is run by an American lady. Maison Thomas has multiple locations in Cairo, including Mohandiseen, Zamalek, and Maadi, and offers some of the greatest pizza in town. There is an Italian restaurant named the Mint in Mohandesseen, 30 Gezirt Al Arab ST., open 9AM-1:30, with a very trendy atmosphere but no alcohol. If you prefer more upscale foreign eating, Cairo has plenty of options: Italian, Chinese, and Japanese restaurants, as well as the confusing continental cuisine, abound, particularly in Zamalek, Mohandseen, and Dokki. Rossini seafood restaurant 66 Omar Ibn El Khatab ST +202 2291-8282, Cedars 42 Gezerit Al Arab Mohandeseen +202 3345-0088, this Lebanese restaurant is popular with Mohandesseen’s women, who may order grills and salads on a spacious outside patio.

Hygiene and diet issues

Drinking tap water or eating unpeeled fresh fruits and vegetables is not recommended for health reasons, at least for the first few days of your stay. There are few vegetarian alternatives; nevertheless, L’aubergine in Zamalek is a nice vegetarian restaurant. Aside from that, Egyptian cuisine is dominated by vegetable courses, although watch out for “hidden” meat in stock, sauces, and other dishes. Sushi (slushees?) and ice creams offered outside of major hotels should also be avoided. Also, if serving eggs, make sure they are properly cooked before serving (sunny side up eggs may allow certain organisms to be transmitted).

Self-catering

The Metro chain and Alfa Market, which are located across Cairo, are both handy supermarkets. They often carry Western brands. Vegetables and fruit, on the other hand, are abundant and inexpensive. The Bakery chain, for example, sells western-style bread and pastries. Organic food from the local ISIS brand is available in Metro and Carrefour supermarkets, as well as the Sekem Shop on Ahmed Sabri Street (), Zamalek.

Buying from Souks and outdoor markets is by far the cheapest and most fulfilling choice, not to mention a crash education in Arabic and negotiating, not to mention the product is frequently excellent! Bread is available on practically every street corner and comes in two varieties: whole wheat aysh baladi and white flour aysh shami. Both are cooked fresh every day and brought to every part of the city by hundreds of children riding bicycles. Every neighborhood has a few streets devoted to the sale of fruit and other commodities. Before consuming any fruit, make sure it’s completely washed. In the heat of summer, eating a fresh Roma tomato directly from a market vendor after it has been cleaned is a thrill that is difficult to duplicate. Egypt’s fruits and vegetables may not meet EU or US size criteria, but their flavor is considerably greater.

Small bakeries (furne) serve every kind of baked food conceivable, from nigella and sesame seed bread sticks to croissants, doughnuts, and anything with dates in it. Fresh bread from these bakeries is a lovely alternative to the traditional Egyptian breakfast of beans, beans, and beans, and it is relatively affordable.

How To Travel To Cairo

BY PLAINWith over 16 million passengers each year, Cairo International Airport is Africa's second busiest airport. Egyptair, the national airline, and its Star Alliance members Singapore Airlines, Lufthansa, Swiss, Austrian, and LOT) provide excellent service. Air France, KLM, and Alitalia are members of the Sky Team, whereas British Airways...

How To Get Around In Cairo

If you want to move around Cairo on your own, you'll find that having numerous maps handy is a good idea. Street and place names are spelled differently from map to map and from map to real location, and not every street will show on every map.BY METROThe first...

Prices in Cairo

Tourist (Backpacker) - 32 $ per day. Estimated cost per 1 day including: meals in cheap restaurant, public transport, cheap hotel.Tourist (regular) - 77 $ per day. Estimated cost per 1 day including: mid-range meals and drinks, transportation, hotel.MARKET / SUPERMARKETMilk1 liter$ 1.15Tomatoes1 kg$ 0.60Cheese0.5 kg$ 2.70Apples1 kg$ 1.98 Oranges1...

Districts & Neighbourhoods In Cairo

Greater Cairo is a massive metropolis with a population of over 17 million people, making it Africa's and the Middle East's biggest metropolitan region. Tahrir Square is the focal point.MIDAN TAHRIRMidan El Tahrir is the heart of the contemporary city, with large hotels, transportation hubs, and the Egyptian Museum,...

Sights & Landmarks In Cairo

Pyramids of Giza and the Sphinx. It is the country's most renowned tourist destination and the only preserved monument of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.Egyptian Museum (250 m north of Tahrir square),  +20 2 25796948. The Egyptian Museum, formally called Museum of Egyptian Antiquities but often known as the Egyptian...

Museums & Galleries In Cairo

Egyptian Museum Located in the Midan Tahrir neighborhood, it is formally known as the Museum of Egyptian Antiquities but is more often referred to as the Egyptian Museum. It has the world's finest collection of ancient Egyptian antiquities.(250 m north of Tahrir square),  +20 2 25796948. Museu do CairoThe Egyptian Museum in...

Things To Do In Cairo

Coffee and shishaEl Fishawy's coffee shop in Khan El-Khalili serves coffee, mint tea, and Cola. Watch the world go by while smoking a shisha water pipe (try the "double apple" flavor). Excellent value for money.FeluccaAlong the Nile River, take a felucca ride. A fantastic way to unwind and spend...

Coffee & Drinks in Cairo

Cairo has a diverse assortment of drinking establishments, from the most historic to the most stylish and sophisticated. On the opposite end of the spectrum, practically every street in Cairo has a classic coffee shop, 'ahwa, a traditionally male institution of social life that dates back hundreds of years....

Shopping In Cairo

Citystars is Egypt's top retail mall and is on par with an international mall. It carries the majority of foreign brands as well as the majority of international culinary chains. It has a cinema and an amusement park. Mall of Arabia is a brand new, huge retail mall in...

Nightlife in Cairo

Cairo, for a Muslim country's capital, is quite open when it comes to alcohol drinking. Every big hotel has a variety of pubs and dance clubs, some of which are open 24 hours a day. Downtown is the place to go if you want to discover Cairo's less upscale...

Festivals & Events In Cairo

Cairo International Film FestivalEgypt's appreciation of the arts in general may be traced back to the Pharaohs' rich legacy. Egypt has had a rich cinematic legacy since the early twentieth century, when the art of filming was initially pioneered. Cinema quickly blossomed into a massive motion picture business as...

Stay Safe & Healthy In Cairo

Stay safeCivil unrest has been a chronic concern in Cairo since 2011, when a revolution deposed President Hosni Mubarak. President Mohamed Morsi was deposed in July 2013, sparking deadly street protests and riots. Protests in Tahrir Square and others, although typically nonviolent in nature, may quickly turn violent, posing...

Asia

Africa

South America

Europe

North America

Most Popular